Tribal Link

Call for inputs for the UN Secretary-General’s report on “human rights and cultural diversity

Following the adoption of resolution 72/170 entitled “Human rights and cultural diversity” by the General Assembly on 19 December 2017, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights is preparing a report for submission the General Assembly in September 2019.

In paragraph 24 of the resolution, the General Assembly “requests the Secretary-General to prepare a report on the implementation of the present resolution, including efforts undertaken at the national, regional and international levels regarding the recognition and importance of cultural diversity among all peoples and nations in the world and taking into account the views of Member States, relevant United Nations agencies and non- governmental organizations, and to submit the report to the General Assembly at its seventy-fourth session”.

Indigenous Peoples and civil society partners are invited to contribute any relevant information, including on challenges, legislation, public policies, programmes and other relevant measures and good practices in realising human rights and cultural diversity.

The OHCHR would also appreciate if you could send your organization’s contribution to OHCHR at United Nations Office at Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 10; fax. +41 22 917 90 08; e-mail: registry@ohchr.org or escr@ohcr.org by 27 April 2019.

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Reminder: Last Day for New Organizations to Register for UNPFII

Reminder: For New IPOs and Academics participating for the first time at a session of the Permanent Forum, first, read carefully the participation guide. You must create a new profile in the integrated Civil Society Organizations (iCSO) System. Deadline for online application for approval is today, 25 March 2019.

To review the participation guide: Click Here

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Report on Recognition, Reparations and Reconciliation: Call for submissions

The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples will prepare a report on Recognition, reparations and reconciliation under its mandate in resolution 33/25 (2b). The Expert Mechanism will present a draft of this report for discussion at its next session from 15-19 July 2019. A final version will be presented to the Human Rights Council at its forty-second session (September 2019).

The Expert Mechanism hereby requests contributions from States, indigenous peoples, NHRIs and other stakeholders to this report. Submissions should be sent to the expertmechanism@ohchr.org, no later than 28 February 2019, in English, French or Spanish.

Submissions should focus on the themes contained in the concept note in English | Spanish.

All submissions will be placed on the OHCHR website unless indicated otherwise.

General call for contributions on the consequences of exposure of indigenous people to toxic and otherwise hazardous substances

The Special Rapporteur on the implications for human rights of the environmentally sound management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes, pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 36/15 will dedicate his upcoming report to the UN General Assembly in 2019 to examining the consequences of exposure of indigenous people all around the world to toxic and otherwise hazardous substances.

The report will be preceded by a study on the same subject, which he intends to present to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in April 2019. At its 16th session, the Forum invited the Special rapporteur to carry out a review within his mandated area of expertise and to present conclusions to the Forum.

Responses to the questionnaire can be sent no later than 15 February 2019 to srtoxicwaste@ohchr.org (preferred option) or addressed to:

  1. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) 
    Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division 
    Palais des Nations 
    CH-1211 Geneva 10 
    Attn.: Special Rapporteur on human rights and toxics 
    Fax: +41 22 917 9006

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‘We can do it’: Yalitza Aparicio’s Vogue cover hailed by indigenous women

The indigenous Mexican actor Yalitza Aparicio has made history by appearing on the cover of Vogue Mexico, in a first for a country where light-skinned people dominate the media landscape – despite an overwhelmingly mestizo and indigenous population.

Aparicio, who has won acclaim for her debut performance in Alfonso Cuarón’s new film Roma, wears a Gucci dress on the magazine’s December edition, next to the title “In tiu’n ntav’i” – “A star is born” – in the indigenous Mixtec language.

Article source: The Guardian

Roma actor’s Vogue Mexico cover is first for country where light-skinned people dominate media landscape


Roma actor’s Vogue Mexico cover is first for country where light-skinned people dominate media landscape

EGM: Conservation and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 23-25 January 2019 Nairobi, Kenya

Every year, the Indigenous Peoples in Development Branch within the Division of Inclusive Social Development of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs organizes an international expert group meeting (EGM) on a theme recommended by the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and endorsed by the Economic and Social Council. In 2019, the expert group meeting will be held on the theme “Conservation and the rights of indigenous peoples” as recommended by the Permanent Forum at its 2018 annual session.

Indigenous peoples play a crucial role in the conservation of the environment. They make up around 5% of the global population and occupy, own or manage an estimated 20% to 25% of the Earth’s land surface. This land area holds 80% of the planet’s biodiversity and intersects with about 40% of all terrestrial protected areas and ecologically intact landscapes. While the expanse of protected areas nearly doubled from 8.7 million sq. km. to 16.1 million sq km. between 1980 and 2000, some estimates suggest that 50% of protected areas worldwide have been established on lands of indigenous peoples.  This proportion is even higher in the Americas, where it may exceed 90% in Central America. The lands of indigenous peoples are very valuable for conservation as about 65% of them have not been intensively developed, compared with 44% of other lands.

However, indigenous peoples’ custodianship of the environment and ecosystems, and their rights to land and housing are unrecognized.  They face the negative impacts of conservation programmes, which often have been based on the concept of protecting natural resources and biological diversity, while excluding human beings from these areas. Since the creation of the first State-designated protected area, Yellowstone Park, in the United States of America in 1872 and the subsequent Yosemite National Park in 1890 whereby the US government violently expelled Native Americans living in or dependent on the resources in the areas, conservation interventions around the world have far too often resulted in gross violations of the rights of indigenous peoples, in particular to their rights to land and housing. This includes forced displacement and evictions from their territories; criminalization and destruction of livelihoods; loss of rights to lands and resources and sacred sites; violence and extrajudicial killings of environmental human rights defenders which have spoken out on behalf of their own indigenous communities Millions  of indigenous persons have been dispossessed and displaced due to the exclusionary approach of protected-area management built on the premise that human activities are incompatible with conservation.  This approach is often referred to as ”fortress” conservation.

Learn more about the EGM: Conservation and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 23-25 January 2019 Nairobi, Kenya.

Article source: UNPFII

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Trump administration moves closer to opening Alaskan Arctic to drilling

The Trump administration has moved a step closer to opening the Alaskan Arctic to oil and gas drilling as soon as next year.

The interior department’s Bureau of Land Management has published its draft environmental impact study, following Congress voting in 2017 to allow drilling within the Arctic national wildlife refuge.

Leasing the long-protected Arctic area could be most problematic for indigenous populations, many of which rely on subsistence hunting and fishing, according to the government assessment.

Article Source: The Guardian

Native American leaders hold signs against drilling in the Arctic refuge outside the Capitol in Washington DC on 11 December. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Native American leaders hold signs against drilling in the Arctic refuge outside the Capitol in Washington DC on 11 December. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Reminder: Invitation for views on the preparation, scope and content of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework

Date: 11 December 2018

From: Executive Secretary, Convention on Biological Diversity

To: CBD National Focal Points, CPB Focal Points, ABS Focal Points, indigenous peoples and local communities, relevant organizations.

Subject: Reminder: Invitation for views on the preparation, scope and content of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework

Thematic area: Convention on Biological Diversity

Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit-sharing

Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety 

Ref.: SCBD/OES/DC/RH/KNM/87538

 

NOTIFICATION No. 2018-102


Dear Madam/Sir,

Further to notification 2018-063 (https://www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2018/ntf-2018-063-post2020-en.pdf) I would like to remind you that the deadline for providing initial views on the aspects of the scope and content of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework (including the resource mobilization component) is 15 December 2018. Initial views should be sent by e-mail to secretariat@cbd.int or fax to +1-514-288-6588.

A preliminary synthesis and analysis of the views submitted was made available for the information of the fourteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties as document  CBD/COP/14/INF/16 (https://www.cbd.int/doc/c/09c0/0f53/a4cef3e6647ba15a68aec411/cop-14-inf-16-en.pdf). Kindly note that all of the views received to date are accessible from https://www.cbd.int/post2020/submissions.shtml

The text of this notification is also available on the CBD website at: http://www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2018/ntf-2018-102-post2020-en.pdf

Please accept, Madam/Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.

 

Cristiana Paşca Palmer, PhD

Executive Secretary

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity

United Nations Environment Programme

413 Saint-Jacques Street, Suite 800

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

H2Y 1N9

Tel: +1 514 288 2220

Fax: +1 514 288 6588

E-mail: secretariat@cbd.int

Web: http://www.cbd.int



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Mission statement about Indigenous Peoples in Ecuador

United Nations Special Rapporteur UNSR Victoria Tauli-Corpuz has made a mission statement after visiting Ecuador the last couple of weeks.

“My main concern has been how to recover the path towards plurinationalism. I must conclude that there is no way to make the commitments in the Constitution true without the full recognition and implementation of indigenous peoples' rights in accordance with international human rights law. Protection of rights of nature cannot be achieved without protection of stewards. I am hopeful that definite steps towards this goal can be achieved through the ongoing open dialogue between the Ecuadorian State and indigenous peoples and nationalities.”

Read the full statement here http://unsr.vtaulicorpuz.org/…/stat…/267-end-mission-ecuador

Leerlo en español aquí http://unsr.vtaulicorpuz.org/…/decl…/267-end-mission-ecuador

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Apply for funding for the UNPFII and other meetings!  

Hello friends, just to let you know that the deadline to apply has been further extended until October 31st, so you still have time to apply for funding for the UNPFII and other meetings! // 

Hola amigos, solo para informarles que la fecha límite para postularse se extendió hasta el 31 de octubre, ¡así que aún tiene tiempo para solicitar fondos para el UNPFII y otras reuniones!

Olá amigos, só para informar que o prazo para inscrição foi prorrogado até 31 de outubro, então você ainda tem tempo para solicitar financiamento para o Foro Permanente e outras reuniões!

https://www.ohchr.org/en/issues/ipeoples/ipeoplesfund/pages/ipeoplesfundindex.aspx

Call for Nominations – Membership of PFII 2020-2022

Vacancies to be filled from January 2020 to December 2022

The current membership of the Permanent Forum is due to expire at the end of 2019.

Nominations are now requested for the three-year period from January 2020 until December 2022. Current members who have served the maximum of two terms (six years) as Permanent Forum members cannot be nominated for a further term.


Nominations by indigenous people’s organizations

According to established practice, the eight indigenous nominated members are from each of the seven socio-cultural regions determined to give broad representation to the world’s indigenous peoples. These socio-cultural regions are: Africa; the Arctic; Asia; Central and South America and the Caribbean; Eastern Europe, Russian Federation, Central Asia and Transcaucasia; North America; and the Pacific.

The eighth member is nominated from one of the three regions with the largest indigenous population (Africa; Asia; and Central and South America and the Caribbean).  This seat rotates among these three regions every three years, thus adding a second member from that region for each three-year term. (See ECOSOC Decision 2016/205, Election 2).

Therefore, for the membership 2020–2022, there will be two members of the Permanent Forum from Central and South America and the Caribbean.

Download the Call for nominations by DESAEN | SP | FR | RU

How to submit nominations:

To send in nominations for consideration the following documents are required:

  • Nomination letter

  • A recent resume/curriculum vitae of the nominee (maximum 2 printed pages in Word format)

  • A short biography of the nominee (200 words)

  • Information on the consultations amongst indigenous peoples’ organizations

  • Information about the nominating organization(s)

Consultations amongst indigenous organizations are encouraged to commence as soon as possible to ensure that the President of the ECOSOC has suitable candidates for consideration and appointment.  In considering possible candidates the organizations are encouraged to take into account the expertise relevant to the mandate of the Permanent Forum as well as the principles of geographic distribution and gender balance.

The deadline for submission of nominations is 25 January 2019.

Where to submit:

All nominations must be submitted by 25 January 2019 via

email:

indigenous_un@un.org | Subject: Nominations PFII 2020–2022

OR correspondence:

Indigenous Peoples and Development Branch – Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
Division for Inclusive Social Development
Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA)
Room S-2954, 405 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017
United States of America

Received nominations will be confirmed by email.

Source: https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/news/call-for-nominations-2020.html

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Eleventh session of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The dates for the Expert Mechanism's eleventh session are 9 to 13 July 2018. The session will take place in Room XX of the Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.

Provisional agenda

Documentation

Documentation for the eleventh session will become available in June 2018.

Accreditation

According to paragraph 9 of resolution 6/36 and paragraph 13 of resolution 33/25, the meetings of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples shall be open to the participation of observers through an open and transparent accreditation procedure in accordance with the rules of the Human Rights Council.

Registration is open to:

  • Representatives of indigenous peoples’ organizations;
  • Representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC);
  • Representatives of NGOs not in consultative status with ECOSOC;
  • Academics and experts on indigenous peoples;
  • National Human Rights Institutions

Accreditation for the 11th session will be carried out through Indico, the online registration platform of the United Nations Office at Geneva.

Accreditation is now open. Please follow the instructions below:

  • Click here to access the EMRIP 11th session registration page
  • Click on “Register now”
  • Create an INDICO account if you have not previously used the system
  • Log in to the system with your username (e-mail address) and password and fill in the registration form.

Please note that each individual participant will have to register themselves.

For questions regarding accreditation, please contact expertmechanism@ohchr.org

More information in English
Más información en español
Informations additionnelles en français

The Game-Changers: 5 Inspiring Women You Need To Know Now

Mikaela Jade

Over the last ten years, the Veuve Clicquot New Generation Award have celebrated some of the most inspiring women in Australia. This year, founder and CEO of technology company Indigital, Mikaela Jade, took out the prestigious Veuve Clicquot New Generation Award (at an event hosted by Freida Pinto none-the-less!), which recognises the success and vision of up-and-coming entrepreneurial women – specifically those under 40 years old.

Jade was spurred to develop the first-of-its-kind app, Indigital Storytelling, after discovering she had Indigenous heritage at the age of 29. From there, she focused on bringing to life the cultural stories, places and artworks of the elders through the use of technology, effectively bridging the gap between generations.

The Veuve Clicquot New Generation Award given to Jade is a nod to the brand’s founder, Madame Clicquot, who took over the company’s reins at the tender age of 27, and went on to invent Rose Champagne blend in 1818 through the use of pioneering techniques that are still used today.

In May 2018, Jade was also awarded the Creative Visionary accolade and overall Judge’s Award at the InStyle and Audi Women Of Style awards.

Read full article here: https://www.instylemag.com.au/inspiring-women-changing-the-world?utm_source=FacebookPaid&utm_campaign=CPV&utm_content=veuve

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Online Registration for the 17th session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII17) is now OPEN

Online Registration for the 17th session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII17) is now OPEN.

For NGOs with ECOSOC Status, IPOs and Academics that have participated at previous sessions of the Permanent Forum:

For New IPOs and Academics participating for the first time at a session of the Permanent Forum:

  • First, read carefully the participation guide. You must create a new profile in the integrated Civil Society Organizations (iCSO) System. Download the Participation Guide for New NGOs and Academics: http://bit.ly/unpfii17-new-ipos-academics
  • Deadline for online application for approval: 28 March 2018.

Please contact at: indigenous_un@un.org for questions related to your participation.

For details, see https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/unpfii-sessions-2/2017-2.html

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UN expert urges consistent policies for US on indigenous peoples’ rights for projects like Dakota Access Pipeline

By UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights

A UN human rights expert has called on all levels of government in the United States to adopt consistent practices when consulting with indigenous tribes on projects that could affect their rights, like the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The appeal was made by the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz, at the end of a mission to the US to assess the impact of energy development projects. During the visit, Ms. Tauli-Corpuz, noted that, in spite of a US commitment to positive and meaningful engagement with tribal governments, challenges remained.

The Special Rapporteur said: “The legislative regime regulating consultation, while well intentioned, has failed to ensure effective and informed consultations with tribal governments. The breakdown of communication and lack of good faith in the review of federal projects leaves tribal governments unable to participate in dialogue with the United States on projects affecting their lands, territories, and resources.”

Nevertheless, the Special Rapporteur saw encouraging steps being taken by federal agencies to follow procedures set out in the UN’s Declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples.  She said: “Since 2012, the federal government has made commendable efforts to develop policies toward more robust measures.

“I also applaud the January 2017 joint report from the Departments of Interior, Army and Justice to solicit recommendations on engaging tribes in infrastructure-related activities. I am encouraged by the process of meaningful consultation with the tribes that the United States undertook in creating this report, and applaud the efforts made by the government to consider ways in which to improve consultation processes.”

In order to meet the obligations of the UN Declaration, Ms. Tauli-Corpuz said the United States should continue to build efforts to incorporate principles of meaningful consultation with the goal of obtaining free, prior, and informed consent from indigenous peoples as set out in the Declaration.

She added that given the impacts on indigenous peoples of the Dakota Access Pipeline, she was deeply concerned by a presidential memo on 24 January clearing away the last hurdle so that construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline under Lake Oahe could begin. The Special Rapporteur also expressed concern about similar issues on other projects.

The Dakota Access Pipeline issue and other examples in Ms. Tauli-Corpuz’s end of mission statement highlight the many water concerns associated with energy development. In places like the arid west, the substantial volumes of water used in drilling operations cause stress on water supplies. Contamination of underground and surface waters is also a concern, with many projects threatening vital resources in water-scarce regions.

Ms. Tauli-Corpuz said: “A recent Environmental Protection Agency study found scientific evidence that activities in the hydraulic fracturing water cycle can affect drinking water resources through spills, faulty well construction, discharges into surface waters, or disposal into underground injection wells. For indigenous peoples, water provides life, subsistence, and has undeniable spiritual significance. In Lakota, they express this belief as ‘Mni Wiconi: water is life’.”

However, the Special Rapporteur says the outlook is not entirely bleak.  A number of tribes have made entrepreneurial efforts to create tribal utilities for the benefit of their own and neighbouring communities, and are involved in a wide array of energy generation and transmission as large parts of tribal lands are used for the national electrical grid system.

“Indian tribes are owners and operators of new and emerging technologies, breaking the mold of reliance on outside entities,” the Special Rapporteur says. “These examples and many more are proving that by exercising political sovereignty, indigenous peoples can approach energy resource development in a diverse way to support economic sovereignty.”

Indigenous communities in the United States want more control over their energy resources as part of their overall desire for self-determination with respect to their lands, territories, and resources. They are committed to balancing many different sets of concerns in their own approaches to energy development.

The tribes rely on the income generated from natural resources to not only support critical government programs, but also to balance the protection of their lands, waters, and sacred places with the benefit of revenue and jobs.

“I have been very impressed by the remarkable and unshakeable resolve tribes have to find creative ways towards self-determination. Two such companies include the Missouri River Resources, a wholly-owned tribal company by Mandan, Hidatsa, and Arikara Nation which is dedicated to using best practices in the oil and gas industry to generate economic benefits for the tribal community through responsible oil development. Similarly, the Red Willow Production Company, a company wholly owned and managed by the Southern Ute Tribe, has been generating revenue through oil and gas development on their reservation since 1992 and continues to maximize benefits for their tribal community while carefully managing their lands and resources.”

The Special Rapporteur says: “Tribes must continue to be supported to develop capacity and resources to realize self-determination to take advantage of their expanded authority in all areas including in energy development and law enforcement.

“I urge the government to continue to honour its treaty and trust obligations to indigenous peoples to ensure that native communities are not further plagued by violence,” said Ms. Tauli-Corpuz, adding that she hoped the government would provide adequate financing.

Finally, I recommend that for any extractive industry project affecting indigenous peoples, regardless of the status of the land, the United States should require a full environmental impact assessment of the project in consideration of the impact on indigenous peoples rights.”

During her official visit to the United States, Ms. Tauli-Corpuz met Government and State officials, a wide range of civil society and human rights organizations working on indigenous rights. She also visited indigenous communities to hear directly from them about their issues and concerns.

The Special Rapporteur will present a comprehensive report containing her findings and recommendations to the United States Government and the UN Human Rights in September.

The Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, Ms. Victoria Tauli-Corpuz (Philippines), is a human rights activist working on indigenous peoples’ rights. Her work for more than three decades has been focused on movement building among indigenous peoples and also among women, and she has worked as an educator-trainer on human rights, development and indigenous peoples in various contexts. She is a member of the Kankana-ey, Igorot indigenous peoples in the Cordillera Region in the Philippines.

The Special Rapporteurs are part of what is known as the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council. Special Procedures, the largest body of independent experts in the UN Human Rights system, is the general name of the Council’s independent fact-finding and monitoring mechanisms that address either specific country situations or thematic issues in all parts of the world. Special Procedures’ experts work on a voluntary basis; they are not UN staff and do not receive a salary for their work. They are independent from any government or organization and serve in their individual capacity.

See the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

UN Human Rights, country page: United States

Source: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=21290&LangID=E

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UNISDR TO ESTABLISH NEW STAKEHOLDER ADVISORY GROUP FOR SENDAI FRAMEWORK IMPLEMENTATION

GENEVA, 23 February, 2018 - Disaster risk reduction partners are now considering a proposal to establish a new UNISDR Stakeholder Advisory Group and whole-of-society engagement strategy to support implementation of the global plan to reduce disaster losses, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in coherence with the Paris Agreement on climate change and Sustainable Development Goals.

This follows two days of discussions this week attended by 50 representatives from the private sector, trade unions, farmers, education, community based groups, NGOs, indigenous people groups and the media who discussed how to collaborate with UNISDR on an all-of-society approach to reducing disaster risk for sustainable development. (See below for full list of participating organisations.)

Grace Balawag of Tebtebba, the Indigenous Peoples' International Centre for Policy Research and Education, a long-time UNISDR partner, said: “This will be an important platform for voicing the concerns of the indigenous people who are so often marginalized but can bring so much expertise and knowledge to adapt to climate change.”

UNISDR is proposing to create a new Stakeholder Advisory Group that will include 25 members representing all the major stakeholders and partners who will be able to engage as many constituents as possible at the regional, national and local level to implement the the Sendai Framework by 2030.

The members of the Advisory group will be self-elected for a period of two years and will provide guidance and inputs to UNSDR, and give a voice to, and defend the interests of, groups of people who can be most vulnerable to disasters if they are not engaged in disaster risk management and planning.

The Sendai Framework adopted in Japan in 2015 recognized the role of nine major groups and other stakeholders as critical to enabling an all-of-society engagement to achieve the Sendai Framework targets and priorities for action in order to make progress on reducing mortality, the numbers of disaster affected, reduce economic losses and damage to critical infrastructure.

“We want to leverage your expertise and your networks to reach out to local people and their communities,” concluded Shoko Arakaki, Chief, UNISDR Partnerships Branch, at the end of the session.

Many participants reacted very positively and welcomed the initiative and will now go back home and consult their constituents before the proposal to establish a UNISDR Stakeholder Advisory Group is expected to be finally adopted. This engagement mechanism will be also used as a consultation and feedback mechanism to plan and organize the next Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction which will be held in Geneva, in May 2019.

The consultation was attended by the Major Groups and other Stakeholders (MGoS) that are part of the MGoS High Level Political Forum Coordination Mechanism/Steering Group, namely: The Women’s Major Group (WMG), UN Major Group on Children and Youth (MGCY), Indigenous Peoples Major Group (IPMG), Farmers Major Group, NGO Major Group, Scientific and Technological (STC) Major Group, Workers and Trade Unions Major Group, Stakeholder Group of Persons with Disabilities, Volunteer Groups Alliance, Stakeholder Group on Ageing (SGA), Education and Academia Stakeholder Group (EASG), Together 2030 and CSOs for Financing for Development.

In addition to this there was representation from:

The Huairou Commission, Platform for Disaster Displacement, Integrated Research on Disaster Risk (IRDR), the Global Network of Civil Society Organisations for Disaster Reduction (GNDR), Platform on Disaster Displacement, UNISDR Science and Technology Advisory Group, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), European Broadcasting Union, UPS Foundation, UNISDR Private Sector Alliance for Disaster Resilient Societies (ARISE), Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC), United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG), International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) and the Swiss NGO DRR Platform.

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UNPFII Seventeenth Session: 16-27 April 2018

 

Date: 16-27 April 2018

Location: United Nations Headquarters, New York

Theme: “Indigenous peoples’ collective rights to lands, territories and resources”

The Forum members have decided on changes to the two week annual session.  The first week will be all open plenary meetings.  There will be no closed meetings during the first week.

A condensed schedule during the first week will see the Permanent Forum discuss all substantive agenda items.

During the second week of the 2018 session of the Permanent Forum, members of the Forum will hold informal meetings with representatives of indigenous peoples, Member States and UN entities. The purpose of these meetings will be to draw on information presented during the first week, and channel this into policy recommendations that are strategic, focused and actionable.

Indigenous representatives, Member States and UN entities that are accredited to attend the 2018 session of the Permanent Forum are invited to attend these meetings. More details will be available soon. 

The request form for side events is now OPEN. 

Online Registration for the 17th session (UNPFII17) is now OPEN.

For NGOs with ECOSOC Status, IPOs and Academics that have participated at previous sessions of the Permanent Forum:

For New IPOs and Academics participating for the first time at a session of the Permanent Forum:

  • First, read carefully our participation guide. You must create a new profile in our integrated Civil Society Organizations (iCSO) System. Download the Participation Guide for New NGOs and Academics: http://bit.ly/unpfii17-new-ipos-academics
  • Deadline for online application for approval: 28 March 2018.

Please contact us at: indigenous_un@un.org for questions related to your participation.