Tribal Link

China and U.S. clash as Beijing wins seat on U.N. indigenous peoples forum despite Uighur detentions

UNITED NATIONS - China assailed the United States on Tuesday for calling on countries to deprive Beijing of a seat at a U.N. forum over its treatment of the Uighur minority.

It was the second time in as many weeks that the two countries openly clashed at the United Nations over the rights of the Uighurs and other mostly Muslim minorities held in camps in China’s Xinjiang region.

Last week, the United States invited the head of the World Uyghur Congress, Dolkun Isa, to address the U.N. forum on indigenous peoples, infuriating China.

U.S. diplomat Courtney Nemoff said ahead of elections on Tuesday that China’s treatment of Uighurs should be a factor in deciding on membership to the forum tasked with protecting indigenous people worldwide.

“The United States is alarmed that more than a million Uighurs, ethnic Kazakhs, Kyrgyz and other Muslims have suffered arbitrary detention, forced labor, torture and death in camps in China’s Xinjiang” region, said Nemoff. “These atrocities must be stopped. We call on member states to bear this in mind in this important forum.”

A Chinese diplomat took the floor to strongly reject the U.S. statement.

“The U.S. representative made an unreasonable accusation against China and defamation against China,” he said, expressing Beijing’s “strong displeasure over this and our firm opposition to it.”

Read full story here: The Japan Times

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UN Report Highlights the Peoples Who Are Crucial to "Survival of Humanity"

Amassive, United Nations-backed report on biodiversity confirmed that humanity is “sleep-walking” toward a mass extinction of plants and animals. According to the analysis, released on Monday, one million species are threatened with extinction. Human actions, which have significantly damaged land and marine environments, are largely to blame, with one exception. Wildlife managed by indigenous peoples isn’t doing as badly, and the report urges policymakers to listen to their expertise.

See full article here: Inverse

"These people are disproportionately impacted by human-caused pressures on nature."

"These people are disproportionately impacted by human-caused pressures on nature."

Fellowship Programme for people of African descent

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 MAY 2019 

What is it?

The Fellowship programme for people of African descent is a three-week intensive learning opportunity for people of African descent from the diaspora, who are engaged in promoting the rights of people of African descent.

It takes place once a year at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva.

The Fellowship programme provides the participants with the opportunity to:

  • Learn about and deepen their understanding of the international human rights law and the UN human rights system, the international framework to combat racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and intersecting issues with a focus on people of African descent;

  • Strengthen skills in developing project proposals, delivering presentations and submitting information to human rights mechanisms;

  • Gain first-hand exposure to human rights mechanisms;

  • Meet with a wide-range of actors.

The Fellowship Programme was initiated by the Anti-Racial Discrimination Section in 2011 and was further supported by GA resolution on Programme of activities for the implementation of the International Decade for People of African Descent (A/RES/69/16). The High Commissioner is the coordinator of the IDPAD.

What is the aim?

The aim is to strengthen participants’ skills to contribute to the protection and promotion of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of people of African descent in their respective countries. The participants are equipped with the tools necessary to enhance the development of legislation, policies and programmes; to strengthen collaboration of civil society with governments; and to undertake local awareness-raising activities.

For whom?

The candidate must be an individual of African descent living in the Diaspora.

  • The candidate must have a minimum of 4 years of work experience related to the rights of People of African Descent.

  • The programme is bilingual in English and French. The candidate needs to have sufficient command of one of the two languages to be able to participate fully in the programme.

  • The candidate has to submit a letter from an organization working on issues related to People of African Descent or minority rights certifying their status.

  • The candidates must be available to attend the full duration of the programme. The selected fellows will be expected to participate in different activities and to strictly follow the programme.

Since 2011, 72 fellows from 32 countries have participated in the Fellowship programme including Australia, Barbados, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, France, Germany, Guyana, Honduras, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Moldova, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Norway, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela and Virgin Islands.

When?

In 2019, the Fellowship will be held from 25 November to 13 December in Geneva, Switzerland.

How to Apply?

THE CALL FOR APPLICATION FOR 2019 IS NOW OPEN

Applicants are requested to submit the following documents in one single e-mail toafricandescentfellowship@ohchr.org:

  • A Curriculum Vitae

  • A completed, signed and scanned Application Form in one single document.

  • A Personal Statement (maximum 500 words) in which the candidate will explain his/her motivation for applying, and how he/she will use the knowledge gained from the fellowship to promote the interests and rights of people of African descent.

  • An Official Letter from the nominating organization or community certifying the status

  • A copy of the applicant’s passport.

  • Please note that submissions with more than five attachments will not be accepted.

Important: Please mention in the subject header of your e-mail: "Application for the YEAR Fellowship Programme for People of African Descent."

Name the attached document as follows:

LAST NAME First name – Type of document
Example: SMITH Jacqueline – Application form.doc
SMITH Jacqueline – A Personal Statement.doc 
SMITH Jacqueline – Letter certifying Status.pdf
SMITH Jacqueline – Passport.pdf

Deadline for Applications: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 MAY 2019 

Participant’s entitlement

Each fellow is entitled to a return ticket (economy class) from the country of residence to Geneva; basic health insurance; and a stipend to cover modest accommodation and other living expenses for the duration of the Programme.

Selection Process

The selection of the fellows will reflect gender and regional balance. The human rights situation of People of African Descent in the respective countries will also be taken into consideration.

Please note, that because of the volume of messages, applications will not be acknowledged. Only short-listed candidates will be notified.

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Call for submissions: Sustainable Development Goal 2 and the right to food

In October 2019, the Special Rapporteur on the right to food will present a thematic report to the United Nations General Assembly that focuses on the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 2 and other goals relevant to achieving zero hunger and reducing malnutrition by 2030 from a right to food perspective.

For that purpose, the Special Rapporteur is seeking inputs from States, NGOs, private sector actors, academic institutions and all relevant stakeholders, through responses to the question below. Your replies will inform the Special Rapporteur’s analysis and contribute to her thematic report.

Background

It has been over three years since the Sustainable Development Goals officially came into force. The 2030 Agenda sets an ambitious objective: a model of more equitable and sustainable development that puts people at its centre and is explicitly grounded in all human rights, as expressed through the language “no one left behind.” There has been some measurable progress in some countries: for example, the 2018 SDG Progress Report found that extreme poverty has fallen below 11% of the world population. This metric should suggest that we are moving closer to achieving zero hunger per SDG 2, yet it also stands at odds with reports that hunger and malnutrition are increasing.

The 2018 various reports, including FAO, indicate that after a prolonged decline, world hunger appears to be on the rise again. The proportion of undernourished people worldwide increased from 10.6 per cent in 2015 to 11.0 per cent in 2016. This translates to 815 million undernourished people worldwide in 2016, up from 777 million in 2015. In 2017, 151 million children under age 5 suffered from stunting (low height for their age), 51 million suffered from wasting (low weight for height), and 38 million were overweight. In addition to economic, political and structural problems at the global and national levels, external factors such as conflict, drought and other natural disasters linked to climate change are among the key factors contributing to these trends.

Meanwhile, evidence suggests that the SDGs are stalling, not just in the context of SDG2, but in their entirety. Despite efforts to elicit widespread participation in the 2030 Agenda, institutional impediments have hindered effective implementation of the SDGs. Persistent inequalities based on gender, ethnicity, nationality and geography have further undermined the SDGs’ success. The Special Rapporteur seeks to identify these challenges in the hopes that the SDGs may still reach their full potential and enable the realization of human rights, including the right to food. At the same time, the Special Rapporteur would like to emphasize positive developments and good practices that help to eliminate hunger and malnutrition.

Question

In light of the background, above, please provide a brief description of any good practices – particularly practices based on a human rights approach - of States and other stakeholders, including private companies, to address inequality, and to monitor, support and implement progress under the relevant SDGs, notably SDG 2.

Submission of responses

We strongly encourage you to please send your responses in Word format by email to srfood@ohchr.org using the email title "Submission to report on SDGs".

Submissions will also be accepted via regular mail at the following address:

ATTN: Special Rapporteur on the right to food
Special Procedures Branch
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
Mailing address: UNOG-OHCHR, CH-1211 Geneva 10

We kindly request that your submission be concise and limited to a maximum of 5 pages. Due to a limited capacity for translation, we also request that your inputs be submitted in English or French.

To avoid unnecessary duplication: if you have recently replied to other questionnaires from UN human rights mechanisms (or other international bodies) with information that would be relevant to this request as well, we welcome your directing us to those replies.

The deadline for submission is 20 May 2019.

Unless otherwise requested, all submissions will be made publicly available and posted on the Special Rapporteur’s homepage at the OHCHR website.

Please feel free to share this message and the questions with anyone who might be interested in contributing.

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Project Access 2019 Session Begins

Tribal Link Foundation’s premier program, the Project Access Global Capacity Building Training Workshop for Indigenous Peoples began today, April 17, 2019. The training’s 21 fellows hail from around the world and the program is presented in collaboration with the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples; in collaboration with the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples; UNDP’s Equator Initiative; Indigenous Peoples Rights Program, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University; UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues Secretariat; and the US Human Rights Network. This year’s lead trainer is Roberto Múkaro Borrero, International Mechanisms Director for the US Human Rights Network. This year is the 15 anniversary of Project Access.

Roberto Borrero, Project Access lead trainer, gives an overview of Indigenous Peoples engagement at the United Nations to the 2019 Project Access fellows.

Roberto Borrero, Project Access lead trainer, gives an overview of Indigenous Peoples engagement at the United Nations to the 2019 Project Access fellows.

Call for inputs for the UN Secretary-General’s report on “human rights and cultural diversity

Following the adoption of resolution 72/170 entitled “Human rights and cultural diversity” by the General Assembly on 19 December 2017, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights is preparing a report for submission the General Assembly in September 2019.

In paragraph 24 of the resolution, the General Assembly “requests the Secretary-General to prepare a report on the implementation of the present resolution, including efforts undertaken at the national, regional and international levels regarding the recognition and importance of cultural diversity among all peoples and nations in the world and taking into account the views of Member States, relevant United Nations agencies and non- governmental organizations, and to submit the report to the General Assembly at its seventy-fourth session”.

Indigenous Peoples and civil society partners are invited to contribute any relevant information, including on challenges, legislation, public policies, programmes and other relevant measures and good practices in realising human rights and cultural diversity.

The OHCHR would also appreciate if you could send your organization’s contribution to OHCHR at United Nations Office at Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 10; fax. +41 22 917 90 08; e-mail: registry@ohchr.org or escr@ohcr.org by 27 April 2019.

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Reminder: Last Day for New Organizations to Register for UNPFII

Reminder: For New IPOs and Academics participating for the first time at a session of the Permanent Forum, first, read carefully the participation guide. You must create a new profile in the integrated Civil Society Organizations (iCSO) System. Deadline for online application for approval is today, 25 March 2019.

To review the participation guide: Click Here

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Report on Recognition, Reparations and Reconciliation: Call for submissions

The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples will prepare a report on Recognition, reparations and reconciliation under its mandate in resolution 33/25 (2b). The Expert Mechanism will present a draft of this report for discussion at its next session from 15-19 July 2019. A final version will be presented to the Human Rights Council at its forty-second session (September 2019).

The Expert Mechanism hereby requests contributions from States, indigenous peoples, NHRIs and other stakeholders to this report. Submissions should be sent to the expertmechanism@ohchr.org, no later than 28 February 2019, in English, French or Spanish.

Submissions should focus on the themes contained in the concept note in English | Spanish.

All submissions will be placed on the OHCHR website unless indicated otherwise.

General call for contributions on the consequences of exposure of indigenous people to toxic and otherwise hazardous substances

The Special Rapporteur on the implications for human rights of the environmentally sound management and disposal of hazardous substances and wastes, pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 36/15 will dedicate his upcoming report to the UN General Assembly in 2019 to examining the consequences of exposure of indigenous people all around the world to toxic and otherwise hazardous substances.

The report will be preceded by a study on the same subject, which he intends to present to the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in April 2019. At its 16th session, the Forum invited the Special rapporteur to carry out a review within his mandated area of expertise and to present conclusions to the Forum.

Responses to the questionnaire can be sent no later than 15 February 2019 to srtoxicwaste@ohchr.org (preferred option) or addressed to:

  1. Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) 
    Thematic Engagement, Special Procedures and Right to Development Division 
    Palais des Nations 
    CH-1211 Geneva 10 
    Attn.: Special Rapporteur on human rights and toxics 
    Fax: +41 22 917 9006

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‘We can do it’: Yalitza Aparicio’s Vogue cover hailed by indigenous women

The indigenous Mexican actor Yalitza Aparicio has made history by appearing on the cover of Vogue Mexico, in a first for a country where light-skinned people dominate the media landscape – despite an overwhelmingly mestizo and indigenous population.

Aparicio, who has won acclaim for her debut performance in Alfonso Cuarón’s new film Roma, wears a Gucci dress on the magazine’s December edition, next to the title “In tiu’n ntav’i” – “A star is born” – in the indigenous Mixtec language.

Article source: The Guardian

Roma actor’s Vogue Mexico cover is first for country where light-skinned people dominate media landscape


Roma actor’s Vogue Mexico cover is first for country where light-skinned people dominate media landscape

EGM: Conservation and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 23-25 January 2019 Nairobi, Kenya

Every year, the Indigenous Peoples in Development Branch within the Division of Inclusive Social Development of the Department of Economic and Social Affairs organizes an international expert group meeting (EGM) on a theme recommended by the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and endorsed by the Economic and Social Council. In 2019, the expert group meeting will be held on the theme “Conservation and the rights of indigenous peoples” as recommended by the Permanent Forum at its 2018 annual session.

Indigenous peoples play a crucial role in the conservation of the environment. They make up around 5% of the global population and occupy, own or manage an estimated 20% to 25% of the Earth’s land surface. This land area holds 80% of the planet’s biodiversity and intersects with about 40% of all terrestrial protected areas and ecologically intact landscapes. While the expanse of protected areas nearly doubled from 8.7 million sq. km. to 16.1 million sq km. between 1980 and 2000, some estimates suggest that 50% of protected areas worldwide have been established on lands of indigenous peoples.  This proportion is even higher in the Americas, where it may exceed 90% in Central America. The lands of indigenous peoples are very valuable for conservation as about 65% of them have not been intensively developed, compared with 44% of other lands.

However, indigenous peoples’ custodianship of the environment and ecosystems, and their rights to land and housing are unrecognized.  They face the negative impacts of conservation programmes, which often have been based on the concept of protecting natural resources and biological diversity, while excluding human beings from these areas. Since the creation of the first State-designated protected area, Yellowstone Park, in the United States of America in 1872 and the subsequent Yosemite National Park in 1890 whereby the US government violently expelled Native Americans living in or dependent on the resources in the areas, conservation interventions around the world have far too often resulted in gross violations of the rights of indigenous peoples, in particular to their rights to land and housing. This includes forced displacement and evictions from their territories; criminalization and destruction of livelihoods; loss of rights to lands and resources and sacred sites; violence and extrajudicial killings of environmental human rights defenders which have spoken out on behalf of their own indigenous communities Millions  of indigenous persons have been dispossessed and displaced due to the exclusionary approach of protected-area management built on the premise that human activities are incompatible with conservation.  This approach is often referred to as ”fortress” conservation.

Learn more about the EGM: Conservation and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples 23-25 January 2019 Nairobi, Kenya.

Article source: UNPFII

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Trump administration moves closer to opening Alaskan Arctic to drilling

The Trump administration has moved a step closer to opening the Alaskan Arctic to oil and gas drilling as soon as next year.

The interior department’s Bureau of Land Management has published its draft environmental impact study, following Congress voting in 2017 to allow drilling within the Arctic national wildlife refuge.

Leasing the long-protected Arctic area could be most problematic for indigenous populations, many of which rely on subsistence hunting and fishing, according to the government assessment.

Article Source: The Guardian

Native American leaders hold signs against drilling in the Arctic refuge outside the Capitol in Washington DC on 11 December. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Native American leaders hold signs against drilling in the Arctic refuge outside the Capitol in Washington DC on 11 December. Photograph: Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Reminder: Invitation for views on the preparation, scope and content of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework

Date: 11 December 2018

From: Executive Secretary, Convention on Biological Diversity

To: CBD National Focal Points, CPB Focal Points, ABS Focal Points, indigenous peoples and local communities, relevant organizations.

Subject: Reminder: Invitation for views on the preparation, scope and content of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework

Thematic area: Convention on Biological Diversity

Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit-sharing

Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety 

Ref.: SCBD/OES/DC/RH/KNM/87538

 

NOTIFICATION No. 2018-102


Dear Madam/Sir,

Further to notification 2018-063 (https://www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2018/ntf-2018-063-post2020-en.pdf) I would like to remind you that the deadline for providing initial views on the aspects of the scope and content of the post-2020 global biodiversity framework (including the resource mobilization component) is 15 December 2018. Initial views should be sent by e-mail to secretariat@cbd.int or fax to +1-514-288-6588.

A preliminary synthesis and analysis of the views submitted was made available for the information of the fourteenth meeting of the Conference of the Parties as document  CBD/COP/14/INF/16 (https://www.cbd.int/doc/c/09c0/0f53/a4cef3e6647ba15a68aec411/cop-14-inf-16-en.pdf). Kindly note that all of the views received to date are accessible from https://www.cbd.int/post2020/submissions.shtml

The text of this notification is also available on the CBD website at: http://www.cbd.int/doc/notifications/2018/ntf-2018-102-post2020-en.pdf

Please accept, Madam/Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.

 

Cristiana Paşca Palmer, PhD

Executive Secretary

Secretariat of the Convention on Biological Diversity

United Nations Environment Programme

413 Saint-Jacques Street, Suite 800

Montreal, Quebec, Canada

H2Y 1N9

Tel: +1 514 288 2220

Fax: +1 514 288 6588

E-mail: secretariat@cbd.int

Web: http://www.cbd.int



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Mission statement about Indigenous Peoples in Ecuador

United Nations Special Rapporteur UNSR Victoria Tauli-Corpuz has made a mission statement after visiting Ecuador the last couple of weeks.

“My main concern has been how to recover the path towards plurinationalism. I must conclude that there is no way to make the commitments in the Constitution true without the full recognition and implementation of indigenous peoples' rights in accordance with international human rights law. Protection of rights of nature cannot be achieved without protection of stewards. I am hopeful that definite steps towards this goal can be achieved through the ongoing open dialogue between the Ecuadorian State and indigenous peoples and nationalities.”

Read the full statement here http://unsr.vtaulicorpuz.org/…/stat…/267-end-mission-ecuador

Leerlo en español aquí http://unsr.vtaulicorpuz.org/…/decl…/267-end-mission-ecuador

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Apply for funding for the UNPFII and other meetings!  

Hello friends, just to let you know that the deadline to apply has been further extended until October 31st, so you still have time to apply for funding for the UNPFII and other meetings! // 

Hola amigos, solo para informarles que la fecha límite para postularse se extendió hasta el 31 de octubre, ¡así que aún tiene tiempo para solicitar fondos para el UNPFII y otras reuniones!

Olá amigos, só para informar que o prazo para inscrição foi prorrogado até 31 de outubro, então você ainda tem tempo para solicitar financiamento para o Foro Permanente e outras reuniões!

https://www.ohchr.org/en/issues/ipeoples/ipeoplesfund/pages/ipeoplesfundindex.aspx

Call for Nominations – Membership of PFII 2020-2022

Vacancies to be filled from January 2020 to December 2022

The current membership of the Permanent Forum is due to expire at the end of 2019.

Nominations are now requested for the three-year period from January 2020 until December 2022. Current members who have served the maximum of two terms (six years) as Permanent Forum members cannot be nominated for a further term.


Nominations by indigenous people’s organizations

According to established practice, the eight indigenous nominated members are from each of the seven socio-cultural regions determined to give broad representation to the world’s indigenous peoples. These socio-cultural regions are: Africa; the Arctic; Asia; Central and South America and the Caribbean; Eastern Europe, Russian Federation, Central Asia and Transcaucasia; North America; and the Pacific.

The eighth member is nominated from one of the three regions with the largest indigenous population (Africa; Asia; and Central and South America and the Caribbean).  This seat rotates among these three regions every three years, thus adding a second member from that region for each three-year term. (See ECOSOC Decision 2016/205, Election 2).

Therefore, for the membership 2020–2022, there will be two members of the Permanent Forum from Central and South America and the Caribbean.

Download the Call for nominations by DESAEN | SP | FR | RU

How to submit nominations:

To send in nominations for consideration the following documents are required:

  • Nomination letter

  • A recent resume/curriculum vitae of the nominee (maximum 2 printed pages in Word format)

  • A short biography of the nominee (200 words)

  • Information on the consultations amongst indigenous peoples’ organizations

  • Information about the nominating organization(s)

Consultations amongst indigenous organizations are encouraged to commence as soon as possible to ensure that the President of the ECOSOC has suitable candidates for consideration and appointment.  In considering possible candidates the organizations are encouraged to take into account the expertise relevant to the mandate of the Permanent Forum as well as the principles of geographic distribution and gender balance.

The deadline for submission of nominations is 25 January 2019.

Where to submit:

All nominations must be submitted by 25 January 2019 via

email:

indigenous_un@un.org | Subject: Nominations PFII 2020–2022

OR correspondence:

Indigenous Peoples and Development Branch – Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
Division for Inclusive Social Development
Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA)
Room S-2954, 405 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017
United States of America

Received nominations will be confirmed by email.

Source: https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/news/call-for-nominations-2020.html

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Eleventh session of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The dates for the Expert Mechanism's eleventh session are 9 to 13 July 2018. The session will take place in Room XX of the Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.

Provisional agenda

Documentation

Documentation for the eleventh session will become available in June 2018.

Accreditation

According to paragraph 9 of resolution 6/36 and paragraph 13 of resolution 33/25, the meetings of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples shall be open to the participation of observers through an open and transparent accreditation procedure in accordance with the rules of the Human Rights Council.

Registration is open to:

  • Representatives of indigenous peoples’ organizations;
  • Representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC);
  • Representatives of NGOs not in consultative status with ECOSOC;
  • Academics and experts on indigenous peoples;
  • National Human Rights Institutions

Accreditation for the 11th session will be carried out through Indico, the online registration platform of the United Nations Office at Geneva.

Accreditation is now open. Please follow the instructions below:

  • Click here to access the EMRIP 11th session registration page
  • Click on “Register now”
  • Create an INDICO account if you have not previously used the system
  • Log in to the system with your username (e-mail address) and password and fill in the registration form.

Please note that each individual participant will have to register themselves.

For questions regarding accreditation, please contact expertmechanism@ohchr.org

More information in English
Más información en español
Informations additionnelles en français

The Game-Changers: 5 Inspiring Women You Need To Know Now

Mikaela Jade

Over the last ten years, the Veuve Clicquot New Generation Award have celebrated some of the most inspiring women in Australia. This year, founder and CEO of technology company Indigital, Mikaela Jade, took out the prestigious Veuve Clicquot New Generation Award (at an event hosted by Freida Pinto none-the-less!), which recognises the success and vision of up-and-coming entrepreneurial women – specifically those under 40 years old.

Jade was spurred to develop the first-of-its-kind app, Indigital Storytelling, after discovering she had Indigenous heritage at the age of 29. From there, she focused on bringing to life the cultural stories, places and artworks of the elders through the use of technology, effectively bridging the gap between generations.

The Veuve Clicquot New Generation Award given to Jade is a nod to the brand’s founder, Madame Clicquot, who took over the company’s reins at the tender age of 27, and went on to invent Rose Champagne blend in 1818 through the use of pioneering techniques that are still used today.

In May 2018, Jade was also awarded the Creative Visionary accolade and overall Judge’s Award at the InStyle and Audi Women Of Style awards.

Read full article here: https://www.instylemag.com.au/inspiring-women-changing-the-world?utm_source=FacebookPaid&utm_campaign=CPV&utm_content=veuve

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