United Nations Related

Summer Of Solutions

Summer Of Solutions

is a call for applications from young people around the world to create innovative technology-based solutions to global challenges.

This is a new initiative launched by the Office of the United Nations Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth, in partnership with the United Nations Technology and Innovation Labs, United Nations Development Programme,  the Office of Information and Communications Technology and Unite Ideas.

Get more information here: https://ideas.unite.un.org/main/Page/summerofsolutions

#Youth2030

Reminder: Call for applications: Beijing+25 Youth Task Force

The year 2020 will be a confluence of anniversaries including the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Conference and the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPfA), the five-year review of the Sustainable Development Goals, the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Security Council Resolution 1325, and the 10th anniversary of the creation of UN Women.

As we take stock of progress made in advancing women’s rights and gender equality, UN Women is committed to ensuring that young people are at the centre of this process, focusing on the 25-year review and appraisal of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action.

It is within this context that UN Women is announcing a call for applications for the composition of a time-limited Youth Task force that will work closely with UN Women from August 2019 to September 2020, to ensure the meaningful involvement of young people in the global processes of the 25th review and appraisal of the BPfA. The work of the Youth Task Force will be divided into four thematic committees (see the Terms of Reference). Applicants to the Task Force will be invited to indicate preference for membership of a thematic committee.

The task force will consist of young people aged 14 to 30 years, recommended by their youth-led global networks, organizations or civic movements.Each organization, network or movement can recommend up to two candidates. In case your organization/ network is recommending candidates, who are minors, please ensure that all appropriate measures are taken to secure necessary consent from parents/legal guardian prior to submitting the recommendation for a minor. If a minor candidate is selected, it will be subject to the provision of consent and waiver documentation as requested by UN Women.

To apply, please familiarize yourself with the Terms of Reference and Criteria for Nomination, and fill out the application form here. Together with your resume and the recommendation letter from your organization, network or civic movement, please send your application to youth.engage[at]unwomen.org by 15 July 2019, 12 p.m. EDT.

Related links

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UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women

Application guidelines

The UN Trust Fund’s Call for Proposals, now open, is for projects to prevent and end violence against women and girls under the Spotlight Initiative in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. This Call for Proposals, which is available in three languages, accepts multi-year grant applications for up to USD 1 million in English, French and Spanish.

This call is open to applicants in the following categories of target countries:

  1. Latin America: Single Country Project Proposals from Argentina, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico

  1. Sub-Saharan Africa: Single Country Project Proposals from Cameroon, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Mali, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe

  1. Multi-Country Project Proposals from all other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa: Countries under category 2 are not eligible for multi-country project proposals.

Application Guidelines

The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women is now accepting applications for its Call for Proposals under the Spotlight Initiative. The deadline for the submission of concept notes is 31 July 2019, 23:59 EST. For full details about the application process, please consult the following documents:

  • Call for Proposals [ en | es | fr ]

  • Annex 1 – Spotlight Outcome 6 [ en | es | fr ]

  • Annex 2 – Concept Note Form [ en | es | fr ]

  • Annex 3 – Budget Form [ en | es | fr ]

  • All documents in a ZIP archive [ en | es| fr]

The online application will be available from 10 July 2019 – 31 July 2019 at: http://grants.unwomen.org/

Click here to apply

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Bachelet appalled by conditions of migrants and refugees in detention in the US

GENEVA (8 July 2019) - UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet said on Monday she is appalled by the conditions in which migrants and refugees - children and adults - are being held in detention in the United States of America after crossing the southern border. She stressed that children should never be held in immigration detention or separated from their families.

The High Commissioner stated that several UN human rights bodies have found that the detention of migrant children may constitute cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment that is prohibited by international law.*”

“As a paediatrician, but also as a mother and a former head of State, I am deeply shocked that children are forced to sleep on the floor in overcrowded facilities, without access to adequate healthcare or food, and with poor sanitation conditions,” High Commissioner Bachelet said.

“Detaining a child even for short periods under good conditions can have a serious impact on their health and development - consider the damage being done every day by allowing this alarming situation to continue.” The High Commissioner noted that immigration detention is never in the best interests of a child.

Noting the disturbing report by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General on the conditions in migrant centres along the southern border, Bachelet urged the authorities to find non-custodial alternatives for migrant and refugee children – and adults.

“Any deprivation of liberty of adult migrants and refugees should be a measure of last resort,” she said. If detention does take place, the High Commissioner emphasized, it should be for the shortest period of time, with due process safeguards and in conditions that fully meet all relevant international human rights standards.

“States do have the sovereign prerogative to decide on the conditions of entry and stay of foreign nationals. But clearly, border management measures must comply with the State’s human rights obligations and should not be based on narrow policies aimed only at detecting, detaining and expeditiously deporting irregular migrants,” she added.

“In most of these cases, the migrants and refugees have embarked on perilous journeys with their children in search of protection and dignity and away from violence and hunger. When they finally believe they have arrived in safety, they may find themselves separated from their loved ones and locked in undignified conditions. This should never happen anywhere.”

The UN Human Rights Office’s presences in Mexico and Central America have documented numerous human rights violations and abuses against migrants and refugees in transit, including the excessive use of force, arbitrary deprivation of liberty, family separation, denial of access to services, refoulement, and arbitrary expulsions.

The High Commissioner recognised the complexity of the situation and the challenges faced by States of origin, transit and destination. She called on them to work together to address the root causes compelling migrants to leave their homes by implementing crosscutting policies that take into account the complex drivers of migration. These include insecurity, sexual and gender-based violence, discrimination, poverty, the adverse impacts of climate change and environmental degradation.

Bachelet also paid tribute to individuals and civil society organisations that have been providing migrants with the most basic of rights, such as the rights to water, food, health, adequate shelter and other such assistance.

“The provision of lifesaving assistance is a human rights imperative that must be respected at all times and for all people in need – it is inconceivable that those who seek to provide such support would risk facing criminal charges,” she said.

ENDS

* See relevant standards adopted by various UN human rights bodies, including the CMW, CRC, the Special Rapporteur on migrants and torture: 
https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/RegularSessions/Session28/Documents/A_HRC_28_68__Add_3_ENG.docand
https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CRC/C/GC/22&Lang=en

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Call for Applications: Sixth edition of the Intercultural Innovation Award

Please find below a message from the UN Alliance United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC):
 

The United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the BMW Group launched the call for applications of the sixth edition of the Intercultural Innovation Award. Grassroots initiatives that encourage intercultural understanding through innovative methods, with the aim of alleviating identity-based conflicts around the world, are encouraged to apply online at interculturalinnovation.org. This year, the deadline for applications is 31 May, at 5:00 PM EDT.

Following a competitive process, ten organizations will be selected to receive the Intercultural Innovation Award. Based on their needs, recipients will receive a monetary grant to help their projects expand and replicate (total funding available in 2019: USD 100,500). They will also benefit from a one-year mentoring program, which will include capacity-building training in a multitude of areas, from communications to fundraising and project management. Recipients of the Intercultural Innovation Award will also become members of Intercultural Leaders, an exclusive skill and knowledge-sharing digital platform for civil society organizations and young leaders working in the field of intercultural dialogue.

 

Best Regards,
NGO Branch

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China and U.S. clash as Beijing wins seat on U.N. indigenous peoples forum despite Uighur detentions

UNITED NATIONS - China assailed the United States on Tuesday for calling on countries to deprive Beijing of a seat at a U.N. forum over its treatment of the Uighur minority.

It was the second time in as many weeks that the two countries openly clashed at the United Nations over the rights of the Uighurs and other mostly Muslim minorities held in camps in China’s Xinjiang region.

Last week, the United States invited the head of the World Uyghur Congress, Dolkun Isa, to address the U.N. forum on indigenous peoples, infuriating China.

U.S. diplomat Courtney Nemoff said ahead of elections on Tuesday that China’s treatment of Uighurs should be a factor in deciding on membership to the forum tasked with protecting indigenous people worldwide.

“The United States is alarmed that more than a million Uighurs, ethnic Kazakhs, Kyrgyz and other Muslims have suffered arbitrary detention, forced labor, torture and death in camps in China’s Xinjiang” region, said Nemoff. “These atrocities must be stopped. We call on member states to bear this in mind in this important forum.”

A Chinese diplomat took the floor to strongly reject the U.S. statement.

“The U.S. representative made an unreasonable accusation against China and defamation against China,” he said, expressing Beijing’s “strong displeasure over this and our firm opposition to it.”

Read full story here: The Japan Times

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UN Report Highlights the Peoples Who Are Crucial to "Survival of Humanity"

Amassive, United Nations-backed report on biodiversity confirmed that humanity is “sleep-walking” toward a mass extinction of plants and animals. According to the analysis, released on Monday, one million species are threatened with extinction. Human actions, which have significantly damaged land and marine environments, are largely to blame, with one exception. Wildlife managed by indigenous peoples isn’t doing as badly, and the report urges policymakers to listen to their expertise.

See full article here: Inverse

"These people are disproportionately impacted by human-caused pressures on nature."

"These people are disproportionately impacted by human-caused pressures on nature."

Fellowship Programme for people of African descent

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 MAY 2019 

What is it?

The Fellowship programme for people of African descent is a three-week intensive learning opportunity for people of African descent from the diaspora, who are engaged in promoting the rights of people of African descent.

It takes place once a year at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva.

The Fellowship programme provides the participants with the opportunity to:

  • Learn about and deepen their understanding of the international human rights law and the UN human rights system, the international framework to combat racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and intersecting issues with a focus on people of African descent;

  • Strengthen skills in developing project proposals, delivering presentations and submitting information to human rights mechanisms;

  • Gain first-hand exposure to human rights mechanisms;

  • Meet with a wide-range of actors.

The Fellowship Programme was initiated by the Anti-Racial Discrimination Section in 2011 and was further supported by GA resolution on Programme of activities for the implementation of the International Decade for People of African Descent (A/RES/69/16). The High Commissioner is the coordinator of the IDPAD.

What is the aim?

The aim is to strengthen participants’ skills to contribute to the protection and promotion of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of people of African descent in their respective countries. The participants are equipped with the tools necessary to enhance the development of legislation, policies and programmes; to strengthen collaboration of civil society with governments; and to undertake local awareness-raising activities.

For whom?

The candidate must be an individual of African descent living in the Diaspora.

  • The candidate must have a minimum of 4 years of work experience related to the rights of People of African Descent.

  • The programme is bilingual in English and French. The candidate needs to have sufficient command of one of the two languages to be able to participate fully in the programme.

  • The candidate has to submit a letter from an organization working on issues related to People of African Descent or minority rights certifying their status.

  • The candidates must be available to attend the full duration of the programme. The selected fellows will be expected to participate in different activities and to strictly follow the programme.

Since 2011, 72 fellows from 32 countries have participated in the Fellowship programme including Australia, Barbados, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, France, Germany, Guyana, Honduras, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Moldova, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Norway, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela and Virgin Islands.

When?

In 2019, the Fellowship will be held from 25 November to 13 December in Geneva, Switzerland.

How to Apply?

THE CALL FOR APPLICATION FOR 2019 IS NOW OPEN

Applicants are requested to submit the following documents in one single e-mail toafricandescentfellowship@ohchr.org:

  • A Curriculum Vitae

  • A completed, signed and scanned Application Form in one single document.

  • A Personal Statement (maximum 500 words) in which the candidate will explain his/her motivation for applying, and how he/she will use the knowledge gained from the fellowship to promote the interests and rights of people of African descent.

  • An Official Letter from the nominating organization or community certifying the status

  • A copy of the applicant’s passport.

  • Please note that submissions with more than five attachments will not be accepted.

Important: Please mention in the subject header of your e-mail: "Application for the YEAR Fellowship Programme for People of African Descent."

Name the attached document as follows:

LAST NAME First name – Type of document
Example: SMITH Jacqueline – Application form.doc
SMITH Jacqueline – A Personal Statement.doc 
SMITH Jacqueline – Letter certifying Status.pdf
SMITH Jacqueline – Passport.pdf

Deadline for Applications: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 MAY 2019 

Participant’s entitlement

Each fellow is entitled to a return ticket (economy class) from the country of residence to Geneva; basic health insurance; and a stipend to cover modest accommodation and other living expenses for the duration of the Programme.

Selection Process

The selection of the fellows will reflect gender and regional balance. The human rights situation of People of African Descent in the respective countries will also be taken into consideration.

Please note, that because of the volume of messages, applications will not be acknowledged. Only short-listed candidates will be notified.

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Call for submissions: Sustainable Development Goal 2 and the right to food

In October 2019, the Special Rapporteur on the right to food will present a thematic report to the United Nations General Assembly that focuses on the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 2 and other goals relevant to achieving zero hunger and reducing malnutrition by 2030 from a right to food perspective.

For that purpose, the Special Rapporteur is seeking inputs from States, NGOs, private sector actors, academic institutions and all relevant stakeholders, through responses to the question below. Your replies will inform the Special Rapporteur’s analysis and contribute to her thematic report.

Background

It has been over three years since the Sustainable Development Goals officially came into force. The 2030 Agenda sets an ambitious objective: a model of more equitable and sustainable development that puts people at its centre and is explicitly grounded in all human rights, as expressed through the language “no one left behind.” There has been some measurable progress in some countries: for example, the 2018 SDG Progress Report found that extreme poverty has fallen below 11% of the world population. This metric should suggest that we are moving closer to achieving zero hunger per SDG 2, yet it also stands at odds with reports that hunger and malnutrition are increasing.

The 2018 various reports, including FAO, indicate that after a prolonged decline, world hunger appears to be on the rise again. The proportion of undernourished people worldwide increased from 10.6 per cent in 2015 to 11.0 per cent in 2016. This translates to 815 million undernourished people worldwide in 2016, up from 777 million in 2015. In 2017, 151 million children under age 5 suffered from stunting (low height for their age), 51 million suffered from wasting (low weight for height), and 38 million were overweight. In addition to economic, political and structural problems at the global and national levels, external factors such as conflict, drought and other natural disasters linked to climate change are among the key factors contributing to these trends.

Meanwhile, evidence suggests that the SDGs are stalling, not just in the context of SDG2, but in their entirety. Despite efforts to elicit widespread participation in the 2030 Agenda, institutional impediments have hindered effective implementation of the SDGs. Persistent inequalities based on gender, ethnicity, nationality and geography have further undermined the SDGs’ success. The Special Rapporteur seeks to identify these challenges in the hopes that the SDGs may still reach their full potential and enable the realization of human rights, including the right to food. At the same time, the Special Rapporteur would like to emphasize positive developments and good practices that help to eliminate hunger and malnutrition.

Question

In light of the background, above, please provide a brief description of any good practices – particularly practices based on a human rights approach - of States and other stakeholders, including private companies, to address inequality, and to monitor, support and implement progress under the relevant SDGs, notably SDG 2.

Submission of responses

We strongly encourage you to please send your responses in Word format by email to srfood@ohchr.org using the email title "Submission to report on SDGs".

Submissions will also be accepted via regular mail at the following address:

ATTN: Special Rapporteur on the right to food
Special Procedures Branch
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
Mailing address: UNOG-OHCHR, CH-1211 Geneva 10

We kindly request that your submission be concise and limited to a maximum of 5 pages. Due to a limited capacity for translation, we also request that your inputs be submitted in English or French.

To avoid unnecessary duplication: if you have recently replied to other questionnaires from UN human rights mechanisms (or other international bodies) with information that would be relevant to this request as well, we welcome your directing us to those replies.

The deadline for submission is 20 May 2019.

Unless otherwise requested, all submissions will be made publicly available and posted on the Special Rapporteur’s homepage at the OHCHR website.

Please feel free to share this message and the questions with anyone who might be interested in contributing.

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Project Access 2019 Session Begins

Tribal Link Foundation’s premier program, the Project Access Global Capacity Building Training Workshop for Indigenous Peoples began today, April 17, 2019. The training’s 21 fellows hail from around the world and the program is presented in collaboration with the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples; in collaboration with the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples; UNDP’s Equator Initiative; Indigenous Peoples Rights Program, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University; UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues Secretariat; and the US Human Rights Network. This year’s lead trainer is Roberto Múkaro Borrero, International Mechanisms Director for the US Human Rights Network. This year is the 15 anniversary of Project Access.

Roberto Borrero, Project Access lead trainer, gives an overview of Indigenous Peoples engagement at the United Nations to the 2019 Project Access fellows.

Roberto Borrero, Project Access lead trainer, gives an overview of Indigenous Peoples engagement at the United Nations to the 2019 Project Access fellows.

The Equator Prize 2019...

The Equator Prize, organized by the Equator Initiative within the United Nations Development Programme, is awarded biennially to recognize outstanding community efforts to reduce poverty through the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity. As sustainable community initiatives take root throughout the tropics, they are laying the foundation for a global movement of local successes that are collectively making a contribution to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As local and indigenous groups across the tropics demonstrate and exemplify sustainable development, the Equator Prize shines a spotlight on their efforts by celebrating them on an international stage.

Eligible Initiatives

• Community-based associations or organizations

• Community-based enterprises and cooperatives

• Women's associations or organizations

• Indigenous or ethnic minority groups or associations

• Youth groups or associations

• Non-governmental organizations

For more info, visit Equator Initiative (https://www.equatorinitiative.org).

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COP24 in Katowice Concludes with Historic Victory and some Disappointments for Indigenous Peoples

"The most significant and positive victory for Indigenous Peoples at COP 24 was the formal establishment of the Facilitative Working Group (FWG) to develop a workplan for the “Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform.” The Platform is intended to strengthen and exchange traditional knowledge for mitigating and adapting to Climate Change, based on operative paragraph 135 of the Paris Agreement. Difficult issues under debate over the past three years and up until the final negotiating session in Katowice included equal participation between States and Indigenous Peoples in the FWG, protection of Indigenous Peoples rights and traditional knowledge in this process, the definition and identity of “local communities” and the concerns of some States that their “territorial integrity” might somehow be impacted in these discussions regarding traditional knowledge and climate change." 

Review full article: Click here
Article Source: Cultural Survival

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Call for applications for four EMRIP members from four indigenous sociocultural regions

The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is looking for new members. Apply by December 18, 2018. More info below.

Le Mécanisme d'experts sur les droits des peuples autochtones recherche de nouveaux membres. Appliquez avant le 18 décembre 2018. Plus d'infos ci-dessous.

El Mecanismo de expertos sobre los derechos de los pueblos indígenas está buscando nuevos miembros. Aplicar antes del 18 de diciembre de 2018. Más información abajo.

https://www.ohchr.org/…/HRBod…/HRC/SP/Pages/Nominations.aspx

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 18 DECEMBER 2018 (12 NOON GREENWICH MEAN TIME / GMT)

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Apply for funding for the UNPFII and other meetings!  

Hello friends, just to let you know that the deadline to apply has been further extended until October 31st, so you still have time to apply for funding for the UNPFII and other meetings! // 

Hola amigos, solo para informarles que la fecha límite para postularse se extendió hasta el 31 de octubre, ¡así que aún tiene tiempo para solicitar fondos para el UNPFII y otras reuniones!

Olá amigos, só para informar que o prazo para inscrição foi prorrogado até 31 de outubro, então você ainda tem tempo para solicitar financiamento para o Foro Permanente e outras reuniões!

https://www.ohchr.org/en/issues/ipeoples/ipeoplesfund/pages/ipeoplesfundindex.aspx

Call for Nominations – Membership of PFII 2020-2022

Vacancies to be filled from January 2020 to December 2022

The current membership of the Permanent Forum is due to expire at the end of 2019.

Nominations are now requested for the three-year period from January 2020 until December 2022. Current members who have served the maximum of two terms (six years) as Permanent Forum members cannot be nominated for a further term.


Nominations by indigenous people’s organizations

According to established practice, the eight indigenous nominated members are from each of the seven socio-cultural regions determined to give broad representation to the world’s indigenous peoples. These socio-cultural regions are: Africa; the Arctic; Asia; Central and South America and the Caribbean; Eastern Europe, Russian Federation, Central Asia and Transcaucasia; North America; and the Pacific.

The eighth member is nominated from one of the three regions with the largest indigenous population (Africa; Asia; and Central and South America and the Caribbean).  This seat rotates among these three regions every three years, thus adding a second member from that region for each three-year term. (See ECOSOC Decision 2016/205, Election 2).

Therefore, for the membership 2020–2022, there will be two members of the Permanent Forum from Central and South America and the Caribbean.

Download the Call for nominations by DESAEN | SP | FR | RU

How to submit nominations:

To send in nominations for consideration the following documents are required:

  • Nomination letter

  • A recent resume/curriculum vitae of the nominee (maximum 2 printed pages in Word format)

  • A short biography of the nominee (200 words)

  • Information on the consultations amongst indigenous peoples’ organizations

  • Information about the nominating organization(s)

Consultations amongst indigenous organizations are encouraged to commence as soon as possible to ensure that the President of the ECOSOC has suitable candidates for consideration and appointment.  In considering possible candidates the organizations are encouraged to take into account the expertise relevant to the mandate of the Permanent Forum as well as the principles of geographic distribution and gender balance.

The deadline for submission of nominations is 25 January 2019.

Where to submit:

All nominations must be submitted by 25 January 2019 via

email:

indigenous_un@un.org | Subject: Nominations PFII 2020–2022

OR correspondence:

Indigenous Peoples and Development Branch – Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues
Division for Inclusive Social Development
Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA)
Room S-2954, 405 East 42nd Street
New York, NY 10017
United States of America

Received nominations will be confirmed by email.

Source: https://www.un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/news/call-for-nominations-2020.html

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Calls to prioritise indigenous peoples health

New Zealand is calling on the World Health Organization (WHO) and governments to prioritise health improvements for indigenous people worldwide. Health professionals say poor data and resources for cancer diagnosis and treatment for indigenous communities is impacting on survival rates. 

Research conducted by the University of Otago shows poorer Māori cancer survival rates to non-Māori. A situation that's also reflected around the world.

Bridget Robson, Associate Dean Māori at the University of Otago, says, "If we want a Tino Rangatiratanga approach across all nations, indigenous peoples have to have their own data to find out what's going on for them and what the Government's are doing to support them or not."

Over 150 cancer experts and indigenous health experts across the Tasman and the Pacific have now published an open letter calling on the WHO and governments to take heed of the issue. 

Author: Moana Makapelu Lee 

See full story here: https://www.maoritelevision.com/news/national/calls-prioritise-indigenous-peoples-health 

 

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Eleventh session of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The dates for the Expert Mechanism's eleventh session are 9 to 13 July 2018. The session will take place in Room XX of the Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.

Provisional agenda

Documentation

Documentation for the eleventh session will become available in June 2018.

Accreditation

According to paragraph 9 of resolution 6/36 and paragraph 13 of resolution 33/25, the meetings of the Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples shall be open to the participation of observers through an open and transparent accreditation procedure in accordance with the rules of the Human Rights Council.

Registration is open to:

  • Representatives of indigenous peoples’ organizations;
  • Representatives of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC);
  • Representatives of NGOs not in consultative status with ECOSOC;
  • Academics and experts on indigenous peoples;
  • National Human Rights Institutions

Accreditation for the 11th session will be carried out through Indico, the online registration platform of the United Nations Office at Geneva.

Accreditation is now open. Please follow the instructions below:

  • Click here to access the EMRIP 11th session registration page
  • Click on “Register now”
  • Create an INDICO account if you have not previously used the system
  • Log in to the system with your username (e-mail address) and password and fill in the registration form.

Please note that each individual participant will have to register themselves.

For questions regarding accreditation, please contact expertmechanism@ohchr.org

More information in English
Más información en español
Informations additionnelles en français