Inspiring Indigenous internationalism

Excerpt from article: 

The Permanent Forum, as it is often referred to, serves as an advisory body to the United Nations Economic and Social Council (UN ECOSOC). While the UN serves nation-states, the UN PFII provides Indigenous peoples with a unique avenue to voice concerns in an influential setting. However, navigating the UN is complex and often intimidating for many people, and that’s where Project Access shines.

Project Access was established by the Tribal Link Organization to help Indigenous peoples understand the mandate of the UN Permanent Forum. This year, the Project Access training brought together Indigenous leaders from all 7 of the Indigenous regions. The program is delivered with the aid of several UN accredited Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), and most helpfully, with the help of previous participants who serve as mentors. The multifaceted training helps new participants understand the history of Indigenous peoples at the UN, the purpose of the Permanent Forum, and how to deliver effective interventions on the floor. Taking place for the three days preceding the UN PFII, the training brought in speakers from UN accredited Indigenous NGOs (International Indian Treaty Council), UN agencies (Convention on Biological Diversity), and academia (Elsa Stamatopoulou, Director, Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Program, Columbia University). Furthermore, we were able to meet the Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, as well as the Chief of the Secretariat for the Permanent Forum!

See full article at: https://dailynews.mcmaster.ca/article/inspiring-indigenous-internationalism/

Project Access trainees represented the 7 recognized Indigenous regions of the world, facilitated by the Tribal Link Foundation at the UN Development Program in New York, NY.

Project Access trainees represented the 7 recognized Indigenous regions of the world, facilitated by the Tribal Link Foundation at the UN Development Program in New York, NY.