Summer Of Solutions

Summer Of Solutions

is a call for applications from young people around the world to create innovative technology-based solutions to global challenges.

This is a new initiative launched by the Office of the United Nations Secretary-General's Envoy on Youth, in partnership with the United Nations Technology and Innovation Labs, United Nations Development Programme,  the Office of Information and Communications Technology and Unite Ideas.

Get more information here: https://ideas.unite.un.org/main/Page/summerofsolutions

#Youth2030

Global Forum on Food Security and Nutrition • FSN Forum

ONGOING CONSULTATION: Open until:16.08.2019

CFS policy process on the development of the Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition

Combatting malnutrition in all its forms – undernutrition, micronutrient deficiencies, overweight and obesity – is among the most pressing global challenges that countries face today. Urgent actions are needed to address these challenges and the negative impacts associated with malnutrition.

Fostering discussion and debate around policy and institutional reforms are key to promoting sustainable food systems that improve nutrition and enable healthy diets.

The Committee on World Food Security (CFS) is undertaking a policy process which will lead to the development of Voluntary Guidelines on Food Systems and Nutrition. The preparation of the Voluntary Guidelines is informed by the scientific evidence provided by CFS High-Level Panel of Experts on Food Security and Nutrition (HLPE) Report on Nutrition and Food Systems launched in October 2017.

The Voluntary Guidelines are intended to be a reference document that provides guidance to governments, as well as to specialized institutions and other stakeholders, on appropriate policies, investments and institutional arrangements needed to address the key causes of malnutrition in all its forms.

A comprehensive and systemic approach will be followed with a view to addressing policy fragmentation between relevant sectors with special emphasis on the food, agriculture and health sectors, while also addressing livelihood and sustainability challenges.

Following the endorsement by the Committee in 2018 of the Terms of Reference which include the main topics and issues to be addressed by this policy process, a Zero Draft of the Voluntary Guidelines has been prepared and circulated as the result of an inclusive process that involved a wide range of stakeholders. 

The Zero Draft is made up of four chapters. The first one provides the context, the objectives and purpose as well as indications on the nature of the Voluntary Guidelines while the second deals with key concepts concerning food systems and nutrition and guiding principles. Chapter three includes descriptive text intended to inform the preparation of the Draft One of the Voluntary Guidelines. The language of this chapter does not represent suggested text for the Voluntary Guidelines but initial ideas regarding the issues and topics to be covered. Therefore, CFS stakeholders are not expected to provide proposals of amendments of the current text of Chapter 3 during the regional consultations. Both the current structure and content of Chapter 3 will change in the next version of the Voluntary Guidelines, based on the inputs received during the e-consultation. This will be an opportunity for CFS stakeholders to suggest the most appropriate policy areas and interventions to reshape and promote sustainable food systems that improve nutrition. The fourth and final chapter includes provisions regarding the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines and the monitoring of their use and application.

The e-consultation outcomes will contribute to the preparation of the First Draft of the Voluntary Guidelines, which will be negotiated in spring 2020. The final version of the Voluntary Guidelines will be then presented for consideration and endorsement by the CFS Plenary at its 47th Session in October 2020.

Through this e-consultation, CFS stakeholders are kindly invited to answer the following guiding questions using the proposed template:

  1. Does Chapter 1 adequately reflect the current situation of malnutrition and its related causes and impacts, particularly in line with the goals and targets of the 2030 Agenda? What are the underlying problems that currently hinder food systems to deliver healthy diets?

  2. What should be the guiding principles to promote sustainable food systems that improve nutrition and enable healthy diets? What are your comments about the principles outlined in Chapter 2? Are they the most appropriate for your national/regional contexts?

  3. In consideration of the policy areas identified in Chapter 3 and the enabling factors suggested in paragraph 41 of the Zero Draft, what policy entry points should be covered in Chapter 3, taking into account the need to foster policy coherence and address policy fragmentation?

  4. Can you provide specific examples of new policies, interventions, initiatives, alliances and institutional arrangements which should be considered, as well as challenges, constraints, and trade-offs relevant to the three constituent elements of food systems presented in Chapter 3? In your view, what would the “ideal” food system look like, and what targets/metrics can help guide policy-making?

  5. How would these Voluntary Guidelines be most useful for different stakeholders, especially at national and regional levels, once endorsed by CFS?

    To post your contribution click here and scroll down page.



FAO.png

Reminder: Call for applications: Beijing+25 Youth Task Force

The year 2020 will be a confluence of anniversaries including the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Conference and the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPfA), the five-year review of the Sustainable Development Goals, the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Security Council Resolution 1325, and the 10th anniversary of the creation of UN Women.

As we take stock of progress made in advancing women’s rights and gender equality, UN Women is committed to ensuring that young people are at the centre of this process, focusing on the 25-year review and appraisal of the adoption of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action.

It is within this context that UN Women is announcing a call for applications for the composition of a time-limited Youth Task force that will work closely with UN Women from August 2019 to September 2020, to ensure the meaningful involvement of young people in the global processes of the 25th review and appraisal of the BPfA. The work of the Youth Task Force will be divided into four thematic committees (see the Terms of Reference). Applicants to the Task Force will be invited to indicate preference for membership of a thematic committee.

The task force will consist of young people aged 14 to 30 years, recommended by their youth-led global networks, organizations or civic movements.Each organization, network or movement can recommend up to two candidates. In case your organization/ network is recommending candidates, who are minors, please ensure that all appropriate measures are taken to secure necessary consent from parents/legal guardian prior to submitting the recommendation for a minor. If a minor candidate is selected, it will be subject to the provision of consent and waiver documentation as requested by UN Women.

To apply, please familiarize yourself with the Terms of Reference and Criteria for Nomination, and fill out the application form here. Together with your resume and the recommendation letter from your organization, network or civic movement, please send your application to youth.engage[at]unwomen.org by 15 July 2019, 12 p.m. EDT.

Related links

UN Women 50 50.png

UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women

Application guidelines

The UN Trust Fund’s Call for Proposals, now open, is for projects to prevent and end violence against women and girls under the Spotlight Initiative in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa. This Call for Proposals, which is available in three languages, accepts multi-year grant applications for up to USD 1 million in English, French and Spanish.

This call is open to applicants in the following categories of target countries:

  1. Latin America: Single Country Project Proposals from Argentina, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Mexico

  1. Sub-Saharan Africa: Single Country Project Proposals from Cameroon, Chad, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Mali, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe

  1. Multi-Country Project Proposals from all other countries in Sub-Saharan Africa: Countries under category 2 are not eligible for multi-country project proposals.

Application Guidelines

The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women is now accepting applications for its Call for Proposals under the Spotlight Initiative. The deadline for the submission of concept notes is 31 July 2019, 23:59 EST. For full details about the application process, please consult the following documents:

  • Call for Proposals [ en | es | fr ]

  • Annex 1 – Spotlight Outcome 6 [ en | es | fr ]

  • Annex 2 – Concept Note Form [ en | es | fr ]

  • Annex 3 – Budget Form [ en | es | fr ]

  • All documents in a ZIP archive [ en | es| fr]

The online application will be available from 10 July 2019 – 31 July 2019 at: http://grants.unwomen.org/

Click here to apply

UN Women.png

Indigenous Peoples Day moves a step closer to replacing Columbus Day in Grand Forks

GRAND FORKS city council members, acting as the city’s Committee of the Whole, unanimously approved a resolution that would replace the holiday named after the notorious explorer with “Indigenous Peoples Day.” The resolution will head to the council proper at its meeting next week.

Read full story here: https://bismarcktribune.com/news/state-and-regional/indigenous-peoples-day-moves-a-step-closer-to-replacing-columbus/article_b6c56789-3395-5fb2-bffa-0c25275100c7.html

Indigenous Speakers at City Council Meeting in North Dakota

Indigenous Speakers at City Council Meeting in North Dakota

Bachelet appalled by conditions of migrants and refugees in detention in the US

GENEVA (8 July 2019) - UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet said on Monday she is appalled by the conditions in which migrants and refugees - children and adults - are being held in detention in the United States of America after crossing the southern border. She stressed that children should never be held in immigration detention or separated from their families.

The High Commissioner stated that several UN human rights bodies have found that the detention of migrant children may constitute cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment that is prohibited by international law.*”

“As a paediatrician, but also as a mother and a former head of State, I am deeply shocked that children are forced to sleep on the floor in overcrowded facilities, without access to adequate healthcare or food, and with poor sanitation conditions,” High Commissioner Bachelet said.

“Detaining a child even for short periods under good conditions can have a serious impact on their health and development - consider the damage being done every day by allowing this alarming situation to continue.” The High Commissioner noted that immigration detention is never in the best interests of a child.

Noting the disturbing report by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Inspector General on the conditions in migrant centres along the southern border, Bachelet urged the authorities to find non-custodial alternatives for migrant and refugee children – and adults.

“Any deprivation of liberty of adult migrants and refugees should be a measure of last resort,” she said. If detention does take place, the High Commissioner emphasized, it should be for the shortest period of time, with due process safeguards and in conditions that fully meet all relevant international human rights standards.

“States do have the sovereign prerogative to decide on the conditions of entry and stay of foreign nationals. But clearly, border management measures must comply with the State’s human rights obligations and should not be based on narrow policies aimed only at detecting, detaining and expeditiously deporting irregular migrants,” she added.

“In most of these cases, the migrants and refugees have embarked on perilous journeys with their children in search of protection and dignity and away from violence and hunger. When they finally believe they have arrived in safety, they may find themselves separated from their loved ones and locked in undignified conditions. This should never happen anywhere.”

The UN Human Rights Office’s presences in Mexico and Central America have documented numerous human rights violations and abuses against migrants and refugees in transit, including the excessive use of force, arbitrary deprivation of liberty, family separation, denial of access to services, refoulement, and arbitrary expulsions.

The High Commissioner recognised the complexity of the situation and the challenges faced by States of origin, transit and destination. She called on them to work together to address the root causes compelling migrants to leave their homes by implementing crosscutting policies that take into account the complex drivers of migration. These include insecurity, sexual and gender-based violence, discrimination, poverty, the adverse impacts of climate change and environmental degradation.

Bachelet also paid tribute to individuals and civil society organisations that have been providing migrants with the most basic of rights, such as the rights to water, food, health, adequate shelter and other such assistance.

“The provision of lifesaving assistance is a human rights imperative that must be respected at all times and for all people in need – it is inconceivable that those who seek to provide such support would risk facing criminal charges,” she said.

ENDS

* See relevant standards adopted by various UN human rights bodies, including the CMW, CRC, the Special Rapporteur on migrants and torture: 
https://www.ohchr.org/EN/HRBodies/HRC/RegularSessions/Session28/Documents/A_HRC_28_68__Add_3_ENG.docand
https://tbinternet.ohchr.org/_layouts/15/treatybodyexternal/Download.aspx?symbolno=CRC/C/GC/22&Lang=en

OHRHR logo.png

'Protesters as terrorists': growing number of states turn anti-pipeline activism into a crime

From the Standing Rock camps in North Dakota to tree-sits in Texas, activists have attempted to stop pipeline construction with massive shows of civil disobedience. Now they could be forced to change those tactics, or face heavy penalties under a wave of new anti-protest laws that civil liberties advocates say violate the first amendment.

Conservative lawmakers have put forward laws criminalizing protests that disrupt the construction and operation of pipelines in at least 18 states since 2017.

  • Seven states have passed laws that ratchet up the penalties for activists protesting or even planning protests of oil and gas pipelines and other “critical infrastructure”

  • At least six more states are considering such laws

  • In each case, misdemeanors are elevated to felonies, and criminal and civil punishments are escalated drastically

  • The ACLU and the Center for Constitutional Rights have mounted challenges against such laws in Louisiana and South Dakota.

    Article source: The Guardian

Antil Pipeline Laws 2019.png

Consulta en línea FAO – Online consultation FAO

ENGLISH VERSION BELOW

 

A la Organización de las Naciones Unidas para la Alimentación y la Agricultura, FAO, le es muy grato invitarle a participar de la primera consulta en línea en el marco de la 36ª Conferencia Regional de la FAO para América Latina y el Caribe, la cual tiene por objetivo ofrecer un espacio virtual para acceder a información y entregar opiniones respecto a la Agenda de la FAO para el próximo bienio.

A través de este espacio virtual usted podrá enviar sus aportes sobre cuanto hemos avanzado en las temáticas de las tres Iniciativas Regionales de la FAO para la región y cuáles son las políticas, programas y prácticas transformadoras que nos permitirían lograr cambios sustantivos para cumplir las ambiciosas metas de los Objetivos de Desarrollo Sostenible de la Agenda 2030 para no dejar a nadie atrás.

El espacio en línea estará disponible hasta el día 21 de julio de 2019 en: https://es.surveymonkey.com/r/LARC36?lang=es

Si tiene dudas por favor le ruego comunicarse con RLC-Consulta-ANG@fao.org

Esperando contar con su participación, le saluda muy atentamente.

 

Eve Crowley

Secretaria de la Conferencia Regional de la FAO para América Latina y el Caribe

========================

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, FAO, is very pleased to invite you to participate in the first online consultation within the framework of the 36th FAO Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean, which has to offer a virtual space to access information and deliver opinions regarding the FAO Agenda for the next biennium.

Through this virtual space you can send your contributions on how far we have advanced in the themes of the three Regional Initiatives of FAO for the region and what are the policies, programs and transformative practices that would allow us to achieve substantive changes to meet the ambitious goals of the Sustainable Development Goals of the 2030 Agenda so as not to leave anyone behind.

The online space will be available until July 21, 2019 at: https://es.surveymonkey.com/r/LARC36?lang=en

If you have any questions, please contact RLC-Consulta-ANG@fao.org

Hoping to have your participation, best regards

Eve Crowley

Secretary of the FAO Regional Conference for Latin America and the Caribbean

FAO logo.png

HOW A RIGHT-WING ATTACK ON PROTECTIONS FOR NATIVE AMERICAN CHILDREN COULD UPEND INDIAN LAW

A LAW KEY to preventing state welfare agencies from separating Indigenous children from their families is at risk of being overturned thanks to the yearslong effort of a network of libertarian and right-wing organizations.

In the 1970s, between a quarter and a third of Indigenous children across the United States had been removed from their homes. Social services often cited neglect or deprivation — euphemisms for poverty — as grounds for placing children in the custody of non-Native families and institutions, offering birth parents little opportunity for redress. Congress passed the Indian Child Welfare Act in 1978 in order to reform a system designed to destroy Indigenous people.

Last October, a U.S. district judge in Texas declared the law unconstitutional under the Fifth Amendment’s equal protection clause, arguing that it creates a separate set of practices for a so-called racial group. The federal government and four tribes appealed the decision, which is currently pending before the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals. If the ruling is upheld and the case makes its way to the Supreme Court, it could not only upend protections for the nation’s most vulnerable children, but also undermine a foundational concept of Indian law: that to be Indian is political, not racial.

Read full article here: https://theintercept.com/2019/06/17/indian-child-welfare-act-goldwater-institute-legal-battle/?fbclid=IwAR3WF32ku8dSbtTxSpcQYu8iXE0SSEEawKDGMKt3zgiI3hLLa3oWRZ4rfI8

Indian Law.png

Call for Applications: Sixth edition of the Intercultural Innovation Award

Please find below a message from the UN Alliance United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC):
 

The United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) and the BMW Group launched the call for applications of the sixth edition of the Intercultural Innovation Award. Grassroots initiatives that encourage intercultural understanding through innovative methods, with the aim of alleviating identity-based conflicts around the world, are encouraged to apply online at interculturalinnovation.org. This year, the deadline for applications is 31 May, at 5:00 PM EDT.

Following a competitive process, ten organizations will be selected to receive the Intercultural Innovation Award. Based on their needs, recipients will receive a monetary grant to help their projects expand and replicate (total funding available in 2019: USD 100,500). They will also benefit from a one-year mentoring program, which will include capacity-building training in a multitude of areas, from communications to fundraising and project management. Recipients of the Intercultural Innovation Award will also become members of Intercultural Leaders, an exclusive skill and knowledge-sharing digital platform for civil society organizations and young leaders working in the field of intercultural dialogue.

 

Best Regards,
NGO Branch

Innovation Award.png

China and U.S. clash as Beijing wins seat on U.N. indigenous peoples forum despite Uighur detentions

UNITED NATIONS - China assailed the United States on Tuesday for calling on countries to deprive Beijing of a seat at a U.N. forum over its treatment of the Uighur minority.

It was the second time in as many weeks that the two countries openly clashed at the United Nations over the rights of the Uighurs and other mostly Muslim minorities held in camps in China’s Xinjiang region.

Last week, the United States invited the head of the World Uyghur Congress, Dolkun Isa, to address the U.N. forum on indigenous peoples, infuriating China.

U.S. diplomat Courtney Nemoff said ahead of elections on Tuesday that China’s treatment of Uighurs should be a factor in deciding on membership to the forum tasked with protecting indigenous people worldwide.

“The United States is alarmed that more than a million Uighurs, ethnic Kazakhs, Kyrgyz and other Muslims have suffered arbitrary detention, forced labor, torture and death in camps in China’s Xinjiang” region, said Nemoff. “These atrocities must be stopped. We call on member states to bear this in mind in this important forum.”

A Chinese diplomat took the floor to strongly reject the U.S. statement.

“The U.S. representative made an unreasonable accusation against China and defamation against China,” he said, expressing Beijing’s “strong displeasure over this and our firm opposition to it.”

Read full story here: The Japan Times

Uyghur Photo.png

UN Report Highlights the Peoples Who Are Crucial to "Survival of Humanity"

Amassive, United Nations-backed report on biodiversity confirmed that humanity is “sleep-walking” toward a mass extinction of plants and animals. According to the analysis, released on Monday, one million species are threatened with extinction. Human actions, which have significantly damaged land and marine environments, are largely to blame, with one exception. Wildlife managed by indigenous peoples isn’t doing as badly, and the report urges policymakers to listen to their expertise.

See full article here: Inverse

"These people are disproportionately impacted by human-caused pressures on nature."

"These people are disproportionately impacted by human-caused pressures on nature."

Fellowship Programme for people of African descent

DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 MAY 2019 

What is it?

The Fellowship programme for people of African descent is a three-week intensive learning opportunity for people of African descent from the diaspora, who are engaged in promoting the rights of people of African descent.

It takes place once a year at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva.

The Fellowship programme provides the participants with the opportunity to:

  • Learn about and deepen their understanding of the international human rights law and the UN human rights system, the international framework to combat racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and intersecting issues with a focus on people of African descent;

  • Strengthen skills in developing project proposals, delivering presentations and submitting information to human rights mechanisms;

  • Gain first-hand exposure to human rights mechanisms;

  • Meet with a wide-range of actors.

The Fellowship Programme was initiated by the Anti-Racial Discrimination Section in 2011 and was further supported by GA resolution on Programme of activities for the implementation of the International Decade for People of African Descent (A/RES/69/16). The High Commissioner is the coordinator of the IDPAD.

What is the aim?

The aim is to strengthen participants’ skills to contribute to the protection and promotion of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of people of African descent in their respective countries. The participants are equipped with the tools necessary to enhance the development of legislation, policies and programmes; to strengthen collaboration of civil society with governments; and to undertake local awareness-raising activities.

For whom?

The candidate must be an individual of African descent living in the Diaspora.

  • The candidate must have a minimum of 4 years of work experience related to the rights of People of African Descent.

  • The programme is bilingual in English and French. The candidate needs to have sufficient command of one of the two languages to be able to participate fully in the programme.

  • The candidate has to submit a letter from an organization working on issues related to People of African Descent or minority rights certifying their status.

  • The candidates must be available to attend the full duration of the programme. The selected fellows will be expected to participate in different activities and to strictly follow the programme.

Since 2011, 72 fellows from 32 countries have participated in the Fellowship programme including Australia, Barbados, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, France, Germany, Guyana, Honduras, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Moldova, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Norway, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela and Virgin Islands.

When?

In 2019, the Fellowship will be held from 25 November to 13 December in Geneva, Switzerland.

How to Apply?

THE CALL FOR APPLICATION FOR 2019 IS NOW OPEN

Applicants are requested to submit the following documents in one single e-mail toafricandescentfellowship@ohchr.org:

  • A Curriculum Vitae

  • A completed, signed and scanned Application Form in one single document.

  • A Personal Statement (maximum 500 words) in which the candidate will explain his/her motivation for applying, and how he/she will use the knowledge gained from the fellowship to promote the interests and rights of people of African descent.

  • An Official Letter from the nominating organization or community certifying the status

  • A copy of the applicant’s passport.

  • Please note that submissions with more than five attachments will not be accepted.

Important: Please mention in the subject header of your e-mail: "Application for the YEAR Fellowship Programme for People of African Descent."

Name the attached document as follows:

LAST NAME First name – Type of document
Example: SMITH Jacqueline – Application form.doc
SMITH Jacqueline – A Personal Statement.doc 
SMITH Jacqueline – Letter certifying Status.pdf
SMITH Jacqueline – Passport.pdf

Deadline for Applications: DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION EXTENDED UNTIL 15 MAY 2019 

Participant’s entitlement

Each fellow is entitled to a return ticket (economy class) from the country of residence to Geneva; basic health insurance; and a stipend to cover modest accommodation and other living expenses for the duration of the Programme.

Selection Process

The selection of the fellows will reflect gender and regional balance. The human rights situation of People of African Descent in the respective countries will also be taken into consideration.

Please note, that because of the volume of messages, applications will not be acknowledged. Only short-listed candidates will be notified.

UN_AfricanDescent_posterEN.jpg

Tribal Link Foundation Partners with Indigital Storytelling, Sharedpath and Microsoft for Weekend IT Workshop

Microsoft Store, NY - On April 27 & 28, Tribal Link Foundation partnered with Digital Custodians of Australia and Microsoft to present a weekend IT workshop that connected Indigenous Peoples with Information and Technology platforms and concepts such as bio-tech, block chain, artificial intelligence, cyber security, and augmented reality. The workshop was led by Sean Appoo and Ben Bowen, was held at the Microsoft Store in NYC and was attended by participants of Tribal Link Foundation’s Project Access Global Capacity Training Workshop for Indigenous Peoples and others attending the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. .

Karl Briscoe of Australia along with Roberto Borrero and Tai Pelli of the United Confederation of Taíno People participate in Digital Custodians IT Workshop held at the Microsoft Store in New York City.

Karl Briscoe of Australia along with Roberto Borrero and Tai Pelli of the United Confederation of Taíno People participate in Digital Custodians IT Workshop held at the Microsoft Store in New York City.

Call for submissions: Sustainable Development Goal 2 and the right to food

In October 2019, the Special Rapporteur on the right to food will present a thematic report to the United Nations General Assembly that focuses on the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 2 and other goals relevant to achieving zero hunger and reducing malnutrition by 2030 from a right to food perspective.

For that purpose, the Special Rapporteur is seeking inputs from States, NGOs, private sector actors, academic institutions and all relevant stakeholders, through responses to the question below. Your replies will inform the Special Rapporteur’s analysis and contribute to her thematic report.

Background

It has been over three years since the Sustainable Development Goals officially came into force. The 2030 Agenda sets an ambitious objective: a model of more equitable and sustainable development that puts people at its centre and is explicitly grounded in all human rights, as expressed through the language “no one left behind.” There has been some measurable progress in some countries: for example, the 2018 SDG Progress Report found that extreme poverty has fallen below 11% of the world population. This metric should suggest that we are moving closer to achieving zero hunger per SDG 2, yet it also stands at odds with reports that hunger and malnutrition are increasing.

The 2018 various reports, including FAO, indicate that after a prolonged decline, world hunger appears to be on the rise again. The proportion of undernourished people worldwide increased from 10.6 per cent in 2015 to 11.0 per cent in 2016. This translates to 815 million undernourished people worldwide in 2016, up from 777 million in 2015. In 2017, 151 million children under age 5 suffered from stunting (low height for their age), 51 million suffered from wasting (low weight for height), and 38 million were overweight. In addition to economic, political and structural problems at the global and national levels, external factors such as conflict, drought and other natural disasters linked to climate change are among the key factors contributing to these trends.

Meanwhile, evidence suggests that the SDGs are stalling, not just in the context of SDG2, but in their entirety. Despite efforts to elicit widespread participation in the 2030 Agenda, institutional impediments have hindered effective implementation of the SDGs. Persistent inequalities based on gender, ethnicity, nationality and geography have further undermined the SDGs’ success. The Special Rapporteur seeks to identify these challenges in the hopes that the SDGs may still reach their full potential and enable the realization of human rights, including the right to food. At the same time, the Special Rapporteur would like to emphasize positive developments and good practices that help to eliminate hunger and malnutrition.

Question

In light of the background, above, please provide a brief description of any good practices – particularly practices based on a human rights approach - of States and other stakeholders, including private companies, to address inequality, and to monitor, support and implement progress under the relevant SDGs, notably SDG 2.

Submission of responses

We strongly encourage you to please send your responses in Word format by email to srfood@ohchr.org using the email title "Submission to report on SDGs".

Submissions will also be accepted via regular mail at the following address:

ATTN: Special Rapporteur on the right to food
Special Procedures Branch
Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights
Mailing address: UNOG-OHCHR, CH-1211 Geneva 10

We kindly request that your submission be concise and limited to a maximum of 5 pages. Due to a limited capacity for translation, we also request that your inputs be submitted in English or French.

To avoid unnecessary duplication: if you have recently replied to other questionnaires from UN human rights mechanisms (or other international bodies) with information that would be relevant to this request as well, we welcome your directing us to those replies.

The deadline for submission is 20 May 2019.

Unless otherwise requested, all submissions will be made publicly available and posted on the Special Rapporteur’s homepage at the OHCHR website.

Please feel free to share this message and the questions with anyone who might be interested in contributing.

th.jpg

Project Access 2019 Session Begins

Tribal Link Foundation’s premier program, the Project Access Global Capacity Building Training Workshop for Indigenous Peoples began today, April 17, 2019. The training’s 21 fellows hail from around the world and the program is presented in collaboration with the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples; in collaboration with the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Indigenous Peoples; UNDP’s Equator Initiative; Indigenous Peoples Rights Program, Institute for the Study of Human Rights, Columbia University; UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues Secretariat; and the US Human Rights Network. This year’s lead trainer is Roberto Múkaro Borrero, International Mechanisms Director for the US Human Rights Network. This year is the 15 anniversary of Project Access.

Roberto Borrero, Project Access lead trainer, gives an overview of Indigenous Peoples engagement at the United Nations to the 2019 Project Access fellows.

Roberto Borrero, Project Access lead trainer, gives an overview of Indigenous Peoples engagement at the United Nations to the 2019 Project Access fellows.

Call for inputs for the UN Secretary-General’s report on “human rights and cultural diversity

Following the adoption of resolution 72/170 entitled “Human rights and cultural diversity” by the General Assembly on 19 December 2017, the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights is preparing a report for submission the General Assembly in September 2019.

In paragraph 24 of the resolution, the General Assembly “requests the Secretary-General to prepare a report on the implementation of the present resolution, including efforts undertaken at the national, regional and international levels regarding the recognition and importance of cultural diversity among all peoples and nations in the world and taking into account the views of Member States, relevant United Nations agencies and non- governmental organizations, and to submit the report to the General Assembly at its seventy-fourth session”.

Indigenous Peoples and civil society partners are invited to contribute any relevant information, including on challenges, legislation, public policies, programmes and other relevant measures and good practices in realising human rights and cultural diversity.

The OHCHR would also appreciate if you could send your organization’s contribution to OHCHR at United Nations Office at Geneva, CH 1211 Geneva 10; fax. +41 22 917 90 08; e-mail: registry@ohchr.org or escr@ohcr.org by 27 April 2019.

Office of High Comm.jpg

Reminder: Last Day for New Organizations to Register for UNPFII

Reminder: For New IPOs and Academics participating for the first time at a session of the Permanent Forum, first, read carefully the participation guide. You must create a new profile in the integrated Civil Society Organizations (iCSO) System. Deadline for online application for approval is today, 25 March 2019.

To review the participation guide: Click Here

UNPFII Logo.png

For Native Americans, US-Mexico border is an 'imaginary line'

(THE CONVERSATION) Immigration restrictions were making life difficult for Native Americans who live along – and across – the U.S.-Mexico border even before President Donald Trump declared a national emergency to build his border wall.

The traditional homelands of 36 federally recognized tribes – including the Kumeyaay, Pai, Cocopah, O’odham, Yaqui, Apache and Kickapoo peoples – were split in two by the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and 1853 Gadsden Purchase, which carved modern-day California, Arizona, New Mexico and Texas out of northern Mexico.

Today, tens of thousands of people belonging to U.S. Native tribes live in the Mexican states of Baja California, Sonora, Coahuila and Chihuahua, my research estimates. The Mexican government does not recognize indigenous peoples in Mexico as nations as the U.S. does, so there is no enrollment system there.

Still, many Native people in Mexico routinely cross the U.S.-Mexico border to participate in cultural events, visit religious sites, attend burials, go to school or visit family. Like other “non-resident aliens,” they must pass through rigorous security checkpoints, where they are subject to interrogation, inspection and rejection or delay.

Many Native Americans I’ve interviewed for anthropological research on indigenous activism call the U.S.-Mexico border “the imaginary line” – an invisible boundary created by colonial powers that claim sovereign indigenous territories as their own.

A border wall would further separate Native peoples from friends, relatives and tribal resources that span the U.S.-Mexico border.

Homelands divided

Tribal members say that many Native Americans in the U.S. feel detached from their relatives in Mexico.

“The effect of a wall is already in us,” Mike Wilson, a member of the Tohono O'odham Nation, who lives in Tucson, Arizona, told me. “It already divides us.”

The Tohono O’odham are among the U.S. federal tribes fighting the government’s efforts to beef up existing security with a border wall. In late January, the Tohono O'odham, Pascua Yaqui and National Congress of Indian Americans met to create a proposal for facilitating indigenous border crossing.

The Tohono O'odham already know how life changes when traditional lands are physically partitioned.

By U.S. law, enrolled Tohono O’odham members in Mexico are eligible to receive educational and medical services in Tohono O'odham lands in the U.S.

That has become difficult since 2006, when a steel vehicle barrier was built along most of the 62-mile stretch of U.S.-Mexico border that bisects the Tohono O’odham Nation.

Previously, to get to the U.S. side of Tohono O’odham territory, many tribe members would simply drive across their land. Now, they must travel long distances to official ports of entry.

One Tohono O'odham rancher told The New York Times in 2017 that he must travel several miles to draw water from a well 100 yards away from his home – but in Mexico.

And Pacific Standard magazine reported in February 2019 that three Tohono O'odham villages in Sonora, Mexico, had been cut off from their nearest food supply, which was in the U.S.

Native rights

Land is central to Native communities’ historic, spiritual and cultural identity.

Several international agreements – including the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples – confirm these communities’ innate rights to draw on cultural and natural resources across international borders.

The United States offers few such protections.

Officially, various federal laws and treaties affirm the rights of federally recognized tribes to cross between the U.S., Mexico and Canada.

The Jay Treaty of 1794 grants indigenous peoples on the U.S.-Canada border the right to freely pass and repass the border. It also gives Canadian-born indigenous persons the right to live and work in the United States.

The American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 says that the U.S. will protect and preserve Native American religious rights, including “access to sacred sites” and “possession of sacred objects.” And the 1990 Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act protects Native American human remains, burial sites and sacred objects.

United States law also requires that federally recognized sovereign tribal nations on the U.S.-Mexico border must be consulted in federal border enforcement planning.

In practice, however, the free passage of Native people who live across both the United States’ northern or southern border is curtailed by strict identification laws.

Author: Christina Leza, Colorado College

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here: http://theconversation.com/for-native-americans-us-mexico-border-is-an-imaginary-line-111043.

Verlon Jose.png

Fellowship Programme for people of African descent: Deadline 30 April 2019

What is it?

The Fellowship programme for people of African descent is a three-week intensive learning opportunity for people of African descent from the diaspora, who are engaged in promoting the rights of people of African descent.

It takes place once a year at the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva.

The Fellowship programme provides the participants with the opportunity to:

  • Learn about and deepen their understanding of the international human rights law and the UN human rights system, the international framework to combat racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and intersecting issues with a focus on people of African descent;

  • Strengthen skills in developing project proposals, delivering presentations and submitting information to human rights mechanisms;

  • Gain first-hand exposure to human rights mechanisms;

  • Meet with a wide-range of actors.

The Fellowship Programme was initiated by the Anti-Racial Discrimination Section in 2011 and was further supported by GA resolution on Programme of activities for the implementation of the International Decade for People of African Descent (A/RES/69/16). The High Commissioner is the coordinator of the IDPAD.

What is the aim?

The aim is to strengthen participants’ skills to contribute to the protection and promotion of civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of people of African descent in their respective countries. The participants are equipped with the tools necessary to enhance the development of legislation, policies and programmes; to strengthen collaboration of civil society with governments; and to undertake local awareness-raising activities.

For whom?

The candidate must be an individual of African descent living in the Diaspora.

  • The candidate must have a minimum of 4 years of work experience related to the rights of People of African Descent.

  • The programme is bilingual in English and French. The candidate needs to have sufficient command of one of the two languages to be able to participate fully in the programme.

  • The candidate has to submit a letter from an organization working on issues related to People of African Descent or minority rights certifying their status.

  • The candidates must be available to attend the full duration of the programme. The selected fellows will be expected to participate in different activities and to strictly follow the programme.

Since 2011, 72 fellows from 32 countries have participated in the Fellowship programme including Australia, Barbados, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Denmark, France, Germany, Guyana, Honduras, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Moldova, Netherlands, Netherlands Antilles, Norway, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela and Virgin Islands.

When?

In 2019, the Fellowship will be held from 25 November to 13 December in Geneva, Switzerland.

How to Apply?

THE CALL FOR APPLICATION FOR 2019 IS NOW OPEN

Applicants are requested to submit the following documents in one single e-mail toafricandescentfellowship@ohchr.org:

  • A Curriculum Vitae

  • A completed, signed and scanned Application Form in one single document.

  • A Personal Statement (maximum 500 words) in which the candidate will explain his/her motivation for applying, and how he/she will use the knowledge gained from the fellowship to promote the interests and rights of people of African descent.

  • An Official Letter from the nominating organization or community certifying the status

  • A copy of the applicant’s passport.

  • Please note that submissions with more than five attachments will not be accepted.

Important: Please mention in the subject header of your e-mail: "Application for the YEAR Fellowship Programme for People of African Descent."

Name the attached document as follows:

LAST NAME First name – Type of document
Example: SMITH Jacqueline – Application form.doc
SMITH Jacqueline – A Personal Statement.doc 
SMITH Jacqueline – Letter certifying Status.pdf
SMITH Jacqueline – Passport.pdf

Deadline for Applications: 30 April 2019.

Participant’s entitlement

Each fellow is entitled to a return ticket (economy class) from the country of residence to Geneva; basic health insurance; and a stipend to cover modest accommodation and other living expenses for the duration of the Programme.

Selection Process

The selection of the fellows will reflect gender and regional balance. The human rights situation of People of African Descent in the respective countries will also be taken into consideration.

Please note, that because of the volume of messages, applications will not be acknowledged. Only short-listed candidates will be notified.


Screen Shot 2019-03-19 at 6.30.12 PM.png